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Nutrition in the very old

Nutrition in the very old
Nutrition in the very old

The population of older adults aged 85 years and over (the very old) is growing rapidly in many societies because of increases in life expectancy and reduced mortality at older ages. In 2016, 27.3 million very old adults were living in the European Union, and in the UK, 2.4% of the population (1.6 million) were aged 85 and over. Very old age is associated with increased risks of malnutrition, multimorbidity, and disability. Diet (nutrition) is a modifiable risk factor for multiple age-related conditions, including sarcopenia and functional decline. Dietary characteristics and nutrient intakes of the very old have been investigated in several European studies of ageing to better understand their nutritional requirements, which may differ from those in the young-old. However, there is a major gap in regard to evidence for the role of dietary patterns, protein, vitamin D and other nutrients for the maintenance of physical and cognitive functioning in later life. The Newcastle 85+ Study, UK and the Life and Living in Advanced Age, New Zealand are unique studies involving single birth cohorts which aim to assess health trajectories in very old adults and their biological, social and environmental influences, including nutrition. In this review, we have updated the latest findings in nutritional epidemiology with results from these studies, concentrating on the diet–physical functioning relationship.

Aged 80 and over, Diet, Dietary patterns, Malnutrition, Nutrition, Physical functioning, Protein intake, The LiLACS NZ, The Newcastle 85+ Study, The very old
1-26
Granic, Antoneta
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Mendonça, Nuno
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Hill, Tom R.
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Jagger, Carol
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Stevenson, Emma J.
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Mathers, John C.
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Sayer, Avan A.
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Granic, Antoneta
68bdeb08-01a4-45a8-9b87-7a8728d4c3fa
Mendonça, Nuno
f51ccb07-f330-4678-8349-ca59dccb740c
Hill, Tom R.
bcb4318d-911b-452d-9421-de5884b94f3d
Jagger, Carol
c5af5424-17fc-4372-8581-1fc8b18b0810
Stevenson, Emma J.
6c07e44f-6889-41b5-8b11-afef5bd44b4a
Mathers, John C.
4dfcad8f-65ea-46f8-a219-3573b131be52
Sayer, Avan A.
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb

Granic, Antoneta, Mendonça, Nuno, Hill, Tom R., Jagger, Carol, Stevenson, Emma J., Mathers, John C. and Sayer, Avan A. (2018) Nutrition in the very old. Nutrients, 10 (3), 1-26, [269]. (doi:10.3390/nu10030269).

Record type: Review

Abstract

The population of older adults aged 85 years and over (the very old) is growing rapidly in many societies because of increases in life expectancy and reduced mortality at older ages. In 2016, 27.3 million very old adults were living in the European Union, and in the UK, 2.4% of the population (1.6 million) were aged 85 and over. Very old age is associated with increased risks of malnutrition, multimorbidity, and disability. Diet (nutrition) is a modifiable risk factor for multiple age-related conditions, including sarcopenia and functional decline. Dietary characteristics and nutrient intakes of the very old have been investigated in several European studies of ageing to better understand their nutritional requirements, which may differ from those in the young-old. However, there is a major gap in regard to evidence for the role of dietary patterns, protein, vitamin D and other nutrients for the maintenance of physical and cognitive functioning in later life. The Newcastle 85+ Study, UK and the Life and Living in Advanced Age, New Zealand are unique studies involving single birth cohorts which aim to assess health trajectories in very old adults and their biological, social and environmental influences, including nutrition. In this review, we have updated the latest findings in nutritional epidemiology with results from these studies, concentrating on the diet–physical functioning relationship.

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nutrients-10-00269 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 February 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 February 2018
Published date: 1 March 2018
Keywords: Aged 80 and over, Diet, Dietary patterns, Malnutrition, Nutrition, Physical functioning, Protein intake, The LiLACS NZ, The Newcastle 85+ Study, The very old

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418655
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418655
PURE UUID: 3fe4fd5e-3919-482e-84b6-3bb455918624

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Date deposited: 15 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:47

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Contributors

Author: Antoneta Granic
Author: Nuno Mendonça
Author: Tom R. Hill
Author: Carol Jagger
Author: Emma J. Stevenson
Author: John C. Mathers
Author: Avan A. Sayer

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