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Arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6 - 7 years

Arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6 - 7 years
Arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6 - 7 years
Arachidonic (ARA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, supplied primarily from the mother, are required for early development of the central nervous system. Thus, variations in maternal ARA or DHA status may modify neurocognitive development. We investigated the relationship between maternal ARA and DHA status in early (11.7 wk) or late (34.5 wk) pregnancy on neurocognitive function at age 4 y or 6-7 y in 724 mother-child pairs from the Southampton Women’s Survey cohort. Plasma phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition was measured in early and late pregnancy. ARA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 13% of the variation in ARA concentration in late pregnancy (β = 0.36, P < 0.001). DHA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 21% of the variation in DHA concentration in late pregnancy (β = 0.46, P < 0.001). Children’s cognitive function at age 4 y was assessed by the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence and at age 6-7 y by the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Executive function at age 6-7 y was assessed using elements of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Neither DHA nor ARA concentrations in early or late pregnancy were associated significantly with neurocognitive function in children at age 4 y or age 6-7 y. These findings suggest that ARA and DHA status during pregnancy in the range found in this cohort are unlikely to have major influences on neurocognitive function in healthy children.
0007-1145
Burdge, Graham
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Crozier, Sarah R.
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Sibbons, Charlene
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Fisk, Helena
2483d346-75dd-41b3-a481-10f8bb39cd9f
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Gale, Catherine
02c9278a-46a2-4ec8-999d-ea809a89e976
Robinson, S
83ba63f4-23ee-4994-95ae-32fac12afab5
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Baird, Janis
f4bf2039-6118-436f-ab69-df8b4d17f824
Harvey, Nicholas C.
80a9bda5-e9ba-4f08-88db-aa41df3b942f
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
SWS Study Group, None
fb963721-ab97-4074-85e8-76f943eb757d
Burdge, Graham
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Crozier, Sarah R.
f725a749-98a7-47ba-aa6b-8d8e17c72cad
Sibbons, Charlene
e613c761-bc82-4511-afd6-2d7e3cccc038
Fisk, Helena
2483d346-75dd-41b3-a481-10f8bb39cd9f
Godfrey, Keith
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Gale, Catherine
02c9278a-46a2-4ec8-999d-ea809a89e976
Robinson, S
83ba63f4-23ee-4994-95ae-32fac12afab5
Inskip, Hazel
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Baird, Janis
f4bf2039-6118-436f-ab69-df8b4d17f824
Harvey, Nicholas C.
80a9bda5-e9ba-4f08-88db-aa41df3b942f
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
SWS Study Group, None
fb963721-ab97-4074-85e8-76f943eb757d

Burdge, Graham, Crozier, Sarah R., Sibbons, Charlene, Fisk, Helena, Godfrey, Keith, Calder, Philip, Gale, Catherine, Robinson, S, Inskip, Hazel, Baird, Janis, Harvey, Nicholas C., Cooper, Cyrus and SWS Study Group, None (2018) Arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acid status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6 - 7 years. British Journal of Nutrition. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Arachidonic (ARA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids, supplied primarily from the mother, are required for early development of the central nervous system. Thus, variations in maternal ARA or DHA status may modify neurocognitive development. We investigated the relationship between maternal ARA and DHA status in early (11.7 wk) or late (34.5 wk) pregnancy on neurocognitive function at age 4 y or 6-7 y in 724 mother-child pairs from the Southampton Women’s Survey cohort. Plasma phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition was measured in early and late pregnancy. ARA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 13% of the variation in ARA concentration in late pregnancy (β = 0.36, P < 0.001). DHA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 21% of the variation in DHA concentration in late pregnancy (β = 0.46, P < 0.001). Children’s cognitive function at age 4 y was assessed by the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence and at age 6-7 y by the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Executive function at age 6-7 y was assessed using elements of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Neither DHA nor ARA concentrations in early or late pregnancy were associated significantly with neurocognitive function in children at age 4 y or age 6-7 y. These findings suggest that ARA and DHA status during pregnancy in the range found in this cohort are unlikely to have major influences on neurocognitive function in healthy children.

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Accepted/In Press date: 5 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418660
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418660
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: b852e5af-2e3e-4889-b93a-83f67ee4089f
ORCID for Graham Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967
ORCID for Helena Fisk: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9534-3246
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Hazel Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Janis Baird: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4039-4361
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 15 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 05:12

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Contributors

Author: Graham Burdge ORCID iD
Author: Sarah R. Crozier
Author: Charlene Sibbons
Author: Helena Fisk ORCID iD
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Philip Calder
Author: Catherine Gale
Author: S Robinson
Author: Hazel Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Janis Baird ORCID iD
Author: Nicholas C. Harvey
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: None SWS Study Group

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