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Prospective associations of maternal dietary patterns and postpartum mental health in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort:: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study

Prospective associations of maternal dietary patterns and postpartum mental health in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort:: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study
Prospective associations of maternal dietary patterns and postpartum mental health in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort:: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study
Diet in the first month postpartum, otherwise known as “the confinement diet” in Asia, has unique characteristics that are influenced by traditions, cultures, and beliefs. We aimed to characterize dietary patterns during confinement period in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort and examined their associations with postpartum depression (PPD) and anxiety (PPA). Dietary intakes of 490 women were ascertained in the first month postpartum using 3-day food diaries and dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis. Participants completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at three months’ postpartum; higher scores are indicative of more depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Four dietary patterns were identified: Traditional-Chinese-Confinement diet, Traditional-Indian-Confinement diet, Eat-Out diet and Soup-Vegetables-Fruits diet. The Traditional-Indian-Confinement diet was associated with less PPD symptoms [β (95% CI) −0.62 (−1.16, −0.09) EPDS score per SD increase in diet score] and a non-significant trend with reduced probable PPD (EPDS scores ≥ 13) [OR (95% CI) 0.56 (0.31, 1.01)]. The Soup-Vegetables-Fruits diet was associated with less PPA symptoms [β (95% CI) −1.49 (−2.56, −0.42) STAI-state score]. No associations were observed for other dietary patterns. Independent of ethnicity, adherence to the Traditional-Indian-Confinement diet that is characterized by intake of herbs and legumes, and Soup-Vegetables-Fruits diet high in fruits, vegetables and fish during the postpartum period were associated with less PPD and PPA symptoms, respectively.
Teo, Cherlyen
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Chia, Ai-Ru
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Colega, Marjorelee T.
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Chen, Ling-Wei
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Fok, Doris
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Pang, Wei Wei
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Godfrey, Keith
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Yap, Fabian
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Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Meaney, Michael
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Chen, Helen
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Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
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Teo, Cherlyen
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Chia, Ai-Ru
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Colega, Marjorelee T.
75c5e6c9-9b67-46b9-90e6-e63632163ed8
Chen, Ling-Wei
528a58c5-d5ec-4dd8-b3c4-0f2f2a97ea53
Fok, Doris
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Pang, Wei Wei
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Godfrey, Keith
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Yap, Fabian
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Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Meaney, Michael
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Chen, Helen
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Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
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Teo, Cherlyen, Chia, Ai-Ru, Colega, Marjorelee T., Chen, Ling-Wei, Fok, Doris, Pang, Wei Wei, Godfrey, Keith, Tan, Kok Hian, Yap, Fabian, Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi, Chong, Yap-Seng, Meaney, Michael, Chen, Helen and Chong, Mary Foong-Fong (2018) Prospective associations of maternal dietary patterns and postpartum mental health in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort:: the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) study. Nutrients, 10 (3). (doi:10.3390/nu10030299).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Diet in the first month postpartum, otherwise known as “the confinement diet” in Asia, has unique characteristics that are influenced by traditions, cultures, and beliefs. We aimed to characterize dietary patterns during confinement period in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort and examined their associations with postpartum depression (PPD) and anxiety (PPA). Dietary intakes of 490 women were ascertained in the first month postpartum using 3-day food diaries and dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis. Participants completed the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) at three months’ postpartum; higher scores are indicative of more depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Four dietary patterns were identified: Traditional-Chinese-Confinement diet, Traditional-Indian-Confinement diet, Eat-Out diet and Soup-Vegetables-Fruits diet. The Traditional-Indian-Confinement diet was associated with less PPD symptoms [β (95% CI) −0.62 (−1.16, −0.09) EPDS score per SD increase in diet score] and a non-significant trend with reduced probable PPD (EPDS scores ≥ 13) [OR (95% CI) 0.56 (0.31, 1.01)]. The Soup-Vegetables-Fruits diet was associated with less PPA symptoms [β (95% CI) −1.49 (−2.56, −0.42) STAI-state score]. No associations were observed for other dietary patterns. Independent of ethnicity, adherence to the Traditional-Indian-Confinement diet that is characterized by intake of herbs and legumes, and Soup-Vegetables-Fruits diet high in fruits, vegetables and fish during the postpartum period were associated with less PPD and PPA symptoms, respectively.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 February 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418683
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418683
PURE UUID: 2e28df4d-bf51-4095-9a96-1da8d0ffd5ff
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 16 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:57

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