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Nuclear power: ecologically sustainable or energy hot potato? A case study

Nuclear power: ecologically sustainable or energy hot potato? A case study
Nuclear power: ecologically sustainable or energy hot potato? A case study
We are facing the prospect of fossil fuels running out. The magnitude of the hydrocarbon resource gap and lack of alternative energy sources leaves us with few choices. The gap between supply and demand must be met through either increased efficiency or increased nuclear/renewable energy production. With the proposed development of ten nuclear power stations, government appears committed to using nuclear power to combat the problem. However, the sustainability of this solution is questionable. By taking Hinkley Point, Somerset as a case study, this paper will explore the sustainability of the project by having regard to the environmental impacts on marine biodiversity, as well as questioning the decommissioning and waste disposal costs that have been provided for the project. In doing so, this paper aims to understand whether nuclear energy is truly sustainable or simply a method of shifting the economic and environmental burden of responsibility onto future generations.
1741-6426
181-198
Ginige, Tilak
a67b1784-9530-4f06-9a30-46b5606a93d1
Ball, Frazer
390828dc-a548-427e-9304-e06e1e7d4152
Thornton, Ann
ee193545-5875-4394-a556-55d2bed70cfb
Caine, Catherine
096246ec-b848-42e6-8fd1-abd3cccaeca6
Ginige, Tilak
a67b1784-9530-4f06-9a30-46b5606a93d1
Ball, Frazer
390828dc-a548-427e-9304-e06e1e7d4152
Thornton, Ann
ee193545-5875-4394-a556-55d2bed70cfb
Caine, Catherine
096246ec-b848-42e6-8fd1-abd3cccaeca6

Ginige, Tilak, Ball, Frazer, Thornton, Ann and Caine, Catherine (2012) Nuclear power: ecologically sustainable or energy hot potato? A case study. International Journal of Liability and Scientific Enquiry, 5 (3/4), 181-198. (doi:10.1504/IJLSE.2012.051926).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We are facing the prospect of fossil fuels running out. The magnitude of the hydrocarbon resource gap and lack of alternative energy sources leaves us with few choices. The gap between supply and demand must be met through either increased efficiency or increased nuclear/renewable energy production. With the proposed development of ten nuclear power stations, government appears committed to using nuclear power to combat the problem. However, the sustainability of this solution is questionable. By taking Hinkley Point, Somerset as a case study, this paper will explore the sustainability of the project by having regard to the environmental impacts on marine biodiversity, as well as questioning the decommissioning and waste disposal costs that have been provided for the project. In doing so, this paper aims to understand whether nuclear energy is truly sustainable or simply a method of shifting the economic and environmental burden of responsibility onto future generations.

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Published date: 2012

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418749
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418749
ISSN: 1741-6426
PURE UUID: f7ec0ca9-30f6-46fe-aad7-11d5bbbc9e67

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Date deposited: 21 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 11 Dec 2021 23:26

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Contributors

Author: Tilak Ginige
Author: Frazer Ball
Author: Ann Thornton
Author: Catherine Caine

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