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Exploring the predation of UK bumblebees (Apidae, Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea: examining the effects of annual variation, seasonal variation, plant density and bumblebee gender

Exploring the predation of UK bumblebees (Apidae, Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea: examining the effects of annual variation, seasonal variation, plant density and bumblebee gender
Exploring the predation of UK bumblebees (Apidae, Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea: examining the effects of annual variation, seasonal variation, plant density and bumblebee gender
Invasive carnivorous plant species can impact the native invertebrate communities on which they prey. This article explores the predation of native UK bumblebees (Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant species Sarracenia purpurea and discusses the potential effect of S. purpurea on native bumblebees. Specifically, it evaluates whether the extent to which bumblebees are captured varies (i) over successive years, (ii) across June and July, (iii) with density of distribution of pitchers or (iv) with bumblebee gender. Pitcher contents were examined from an established population of Sarracenia purpurea growing in Dorset, UK. Results show that the total extent to which bumblebees were captured differed over the years 2012–2014 inclusive. A 1-year study in 2013 showed that more bumblebees were caught in July than in June and more bumblebees were captured when pitchers grew at high density. Results from 2013 also showed that more pitchers caught more than one bumblebee than would be expected based on a normal probability distribution and that this phenomenon affects female and male bumblebees equally. We discuss possible reasons for these results including that the bumblebees may be using S. purpurea as a resource. Further work is required to establish the exact underpinning mechanisms and the relative roles of plant and bumblebee behaviour within the relationship. Such interaction complexity may have consequences for consideration in invasive carnivorous plant management.
1872-8855
79-88
Franklin, Elizabeth
d9d3e1bb-b1fa-4300-bb3c-37f8ea0efbb8
Evans, Damian
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Thornton, Ann
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Moody, Chris
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Green, Iain
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Diaz, Anita
ac243170-ff98-4d4f-b3e5-298a3d18ea27
Franklin, Elizabeth
d9d3e1bb-b1fa-4300-bb3c-37f8ea0efbb8
Evans, Damian
ce8ea97c-698b-40e0-86e5-72a38423a1fd
Thornton, Ann
ee193545-5875-4394-a556-55d2bed70cfb
Moody, Chris
9b96c6a8-c5a4-4f64-abc3-f6161a3b54dc
Green, Iain
9fc01270-9b02-4585-b23e-077ff1aa392d
Diaz, Anita
ac243170-ff98-4d4f-b3e5-298a3d18ea27

Franklin, Elizabeth, Evans, Damian, Thornton, Ann, Moody, Chris, Green, Iain and Diaz, Anita (2017) Exploring the predation of UK bumblebees (Apidae, Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea: examining the effects of annual variation, seasonal variation, plant density and bumblebee gender. Arthropod-Plant Interactions, 11 (1), 79-88. (doi:10.1007/s11829-016-9468-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Invasive carnivorous plant species can impact the native invertebrate communities on which they prey. This article explores the predation of native UK bumblebees (Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant species Sarracenia purpurea and discusses the potential effect of S. purpurea on native bumblebees. Specifically, it evaluates whether the extent to which bumblebees are captured varies (i) over successive years, (ii) across June and July, (iii) with density of distribution of pitchers or (iv) with bumblebee gender. Pitcher contents were examined from an established population of Sarracenia purpurea growing in Dorset, UK. Results show that the total extent to which bumblebees were captured differed over the years 2012–2014 inclusive. A 1-year study in 2013 showed that more bumblebees were caught in July than in June and more bumblebees were captured when pitchers grew at high density. Results from 2013 also showed that more pitchers caught more than one bumblebee than would be expected based on a normal probability distribution and that this phenomenon affects female and male bumblebees equally. We discuss possible reasons for these results including that the bumblebees may be using S. purpurea as a resource. Further work is required to establish the exact underpinning mechanisms and the relative roles of plant and bumblebee behaviour within the relationship. Such interaction complexity may have consequences for consideration in invasive carnivorous plant management.

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10.1007%2Fs11829-016-9468-2 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 14 October 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 November 2016
Published date: February 2017

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Local EPrints ID: 418750
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418750
ISSN: 1872-8855
PURE UUID: 1c7be046-c20a-4e37-b602-30e9bb4ed8a9

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Date deposited: 21 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 04:17

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Contributors

Author: Elizabeth Franklin
Author: Damian Evans
Author: Ann Thornton
Author: Chris Moody
Author: Iain Green
Author: Anita Diaz

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