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Developing a closed loop industrial network for sustainable construction

Developing a closed loop industrial network for sustainable construction
Developing a closed loop industrial network for sustainable construction
The ‘ZeroWIN’ (Towards Zero Waste in Industrial Networks – www.zerowin.eu)
project is investigating innovative approaches and strategies for preventing waste in Europe. This paper presents UK case study evidence of how development of an industrial network can contribute to achieving resource efficient construction. A series of improvements and innovations are presented to reduce resource use and close the loop on material flows so that materials are reclaimed and reused or recycled, and in turn inputs contain high recycled content and reduced embodied impacts. The principal pre-requisites for achieving these improvements are the ability to specify input materials, and segregation of materials on-site to enable their optimal reuse or recycling via the network. Barriers to further improvements are discussed; the key challenge to bringing about widespread implementation of the identified improvements will be the willingness of the decision makers to make the effort, take the time, and ultimately bear some extra cost to construct buildings with reduced environmental impact.
Curran, Anthony
13b0dc52-2915-4578-aefc-650be1074eea
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Kent, Andrew
1448d98d-9967-4689-9a10-5485836227a5
Lambourne, Martyn
f023457e-a379-4cd9-ae9c-e4a83ccde233
Curran, Anthony
13b0dc52-2915-4578-aefc-650be1074eea
Williams, Ian
c9d674ac-ee69-4937-ab43-17e716266e22
Kent, Andrew
1448d98d-9967-4689-9a10-5485836227a5
Lambourne, Martyn
f023457e-a379-4cd9-ae9c-e4a83ccde233

Curran, Anthony, Williams, Ian, Kent, Andrew and Lambourne, Martyn (2012) Developing a closed loop industrial network for sustainable construction. In Proceedings of Crete 2012: 3rd International Conference on Industrial and Hazardous Waste Management.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The ‘ZeroWIN’ (Towards Zero Waste in Industrial Networks – www.zerowin.eu)
project is investigating innovative approaches and strategies for preventing waste in Europe. This paper presents UK case study evidence of how development of an industrial network can contribute to achieving resource efficient construction. A series of improvements and innovations are presented to reduce resource use and close the loop on material flows so that materials are reclaimed and reused or recycled, and in turn inputs contain high recycled content and reduced embodied impacts. The principal pre-requisites for achieving these improvements are the ability to specify input materials, and segregation of materials on-site to enable their optimal reuse or recycling via the network. Barriers to further improvements are discussed; the key challenge to bringing about widespread implementation of the identified improvements will be the willingness of the decision makers to make the effort, take the time, and ultimately bear some extra cost to construct buildings with reduced environmental impact.

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More information

Published date: September 2012

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418840
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418840
PURE UUID: 6e4d3b18-56c7-429b-acc9-90c1c5de9376
ORCID for Ian Williams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0121-1219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:40

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Contributors

Author: Anthony Curran
Author: Ian Williams ORCID iD
Author: Andrew Kent
Author: Martyn Lambourne

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