The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Measuring evoked responses to speech

Measuring evoked responses to speech
Measuring evoked responses to speech
Our auditory brain is very good at detecting speech, which we are able to understand when listening in considerable background noise. However measuring the evoked response of the brain to speech using surface electrodes is challenging. A number of groups worldwide are carrying out research in this area, but the limitations and clinical applications of such methods are not yet fully understood.

Artificial stimuli such as clicks and tone pips evoke robust responses such as the Auditory Brainstem Response that, whilst only fractions of a μV in amplitude, can be recorded reliably with appropriate averaging and filtering. Evoked responses to such stimuli are widely used in neonatal hearing assessment and have had great clinical impact as they allow hearing aids to be fitted to infants from a few weeks of age, minimising effects of auditory deprivation. When we fit hearing aids to infants the signal that we are generally most interested in making audible is speech. However measuring the response to clicks and tone pips does not allow us to directly demonstrate that the brain is responding to speech. Also the response of hearing aids to speech on a typical user setting may be different from that produced using artificial stimuli such as clicks or tone pips, so using artificial non-speech sounds may have limitations for evaluating hearing aid benefit.

By measuring evoked responses to speech we may be able to demonstrate that hearing aids give access to speech and/or adjust hearing aids to maximise benefit for the user, but key questions for clinical use are the reliability and duration of measurements. Various approaches have been used in the literature to explore the measurement of evoked responses to speech, using stimuli ranging from simple repeating speech tokens such as ‘da’ through words and sentences to running speech. Also evoked responses to speech have been measured from the brainstem level through to the cortex. In this talk I will summarise key approaches that have been used to measuring evoked responses to speech and discuss their potential application to evaluate or adjust hearing aids. I will also give an update on findings from the EPSRC funded project EP/M026728/1 ‘Personalized fitting and evaluation of hearing aids with EEG responses’. In this project we are exploring the limits of measuring evoked responses to speech with a view to using the most promising methods to evaluate or adjust hearing aids for the end user.
Bell, Steven
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a
Bell, Steven
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a

Bell, Steven (2017) Measuring evoked responses to speech. British Society of Audiology Annual Conference 2017, Harrogate, United Kingdom. 29 - 30 Jun 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Our auditory brain is very good at detecting speech, which we are able to understand when listening in considerable background noise. However measuring the evoked response of the brain to speech using surface electrodes is challenging. A number of groups worldwide are carrying out research in this area, but the limitations and clinical applications of such methods are not yet fully understood.

Artificial stimuli such as clicks and tone pips evoke robust responses such as the Auditory Brainstem Response that, whilst only fractions of a μV in amplitude, can be recorded reliably with appropriate averaging and filtering. Evoked responses to such stimuli are widely used in neonatal hearing assessment and have had great clinical impact as they allow hearing aids to be fitted to infants from a few weeks of age, minimising effects of auditory deprivation. When we fit hearing aids to infants the signal that we are generally most interested in making audible is speech. However measuring the response to clicks and tone pips does not allow us to directly demonstrate that the brain is responding to speech. Also the response of hearing aids to speech on a typical user setting may be different from that produced using artificial stimuli such as clicks or tone pips, so using artificial non-speech sounds may have limitations for evaluating hearing aid benefit.

By measuring evoked responses to speech we may be able to demonstrate that hearing aids give access to speech and/or adjust hearing aids to maximise benefit for the user, but key questions for clinical use are the reliability and duration of measurements. Various approaches have been used in the literature to explore the measurement of evoked responses to speech, using stimuli ranging from simple repeating speech tokens such as ‘da’ through words and sentences to running speech. Also evoked responses to speech have been measured from the brainstem level through to the cortex. In this talk I will summarise key approaches that have been used to measuring evoked responses to speech and discuss their potential application to evaluate or adjust hearing aids. I will also give an update on findings from the EPSRC funded project EP/M026728/1 ‘Personalized fitting and evaluation of hearing aids with EEG responses’. In this project we are exploring the limits of measuring evoked responses to speech with a view to using the most promising methods to evaluate or adjust hearing aids for the end user.

Text
Measuring evoked responses to speech abstract - Author's Original
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: June 2017
Venue - Dates: British Society of Audiology Annual Conference 2017, Harrogate, United Kingdom, 2017-06-29 - 2017-06-30

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418849
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418849
PURE UUID: 468451f4-66b8-4f05-8a09-17f2e3f90df1

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:45

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×