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What is the patient acceptability of real time 1:1 videoconferencing in an orthopaedics setting? A systematic review

What is the patient acceptability of real time 1:1 videoconferencing in an orthopaedics setting? A systematic review
What is the patient acceptability of real time 1:1 videoconferencing in an orthopaedics setting? A systematic review

Background: Real time 1:1 videoconferencing (VC) has the potential to play an important role in the management of orthopaedic pathologies. Despite positive reporting of telemedicine studies uptake in clinical practice remains low. Acceptability to patients is an important element of system take-up in telemedicine and a focus towards qualitative methodology may explore the underlying reasons behind its acceptability. In this paper we have systematically reviewed qualitative studies that include evidence about patient responses to VC services in an orthopaedic setting. Objectives: To determine whether real time 1:1 videoconferencing is acceptable to patients in an orthopaedic setting. Data sources: MEDLINE, AMED, PsychINFO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Cochrane Database, Evidence Search and Open Grey were searched with forwards and backwards reference screening of eligible papers. Eligibility criteria: Qualitative studies exploring the acceptability of VC in an orthopaedic setting were included. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: Studies were appraised using the CASP tool. A Directed Content Framework Analysis was conducted using Normalisation Process Theory. Results: Four studies were included for review. The themes for the four studies did not overlap and did not report clinician acceptability of VC. The Directed Content Analysis of these papers using Normalisation Process Theory highlighted factors which contribute towards its acceptability. Conclusions: All studies concluded that the use of VC was acceptable. Further qualitative research exploring both patient and clinician acceptability is required utilising a theoretical framework to allow for repeatability and generalisability. Systematic Review Registration Number: PROSPERO CRD42015024944.

Normalisation Process Theory, Orthopaedics, Real time 1:1 videoconferencing
0031-9406
Gilbert, Anthony W.
0ec83f00-f9e1-4616-a69f-1b69a9b5a894
Jaggi, Anju
af2e2aa0-ed12-42e5-8a13-b053d7db124c
May, Carl R.
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4
Gilbert, Anthony W.
0ec83f00-f9e1-4616-a69f-1b69a9b5a894
Jaggi, Anju
af2e2aa0-ed12-42e5-8a13-b053d7db124c
May, Carl R.
17697f8d-98f6-40d3-9cc0-022f04009ae4

Gilbert, Anthony W., Jaggi, Anju and May, Carl R. (2017) What is the patient acceptability of real time 1:1 videoconferencing in an orthopaedics setting? A systematic review. Physiotherapy (United Kingdom). (doi:10.1016/j.physio.2017.11.217).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Real time 1:1 videoconferencing (VC) has the potential to play an important role in the management of orthopaedic pathologies. Despite positive reporting of telemedicine studies uptake in clinical practice remains low. Acceptability to patients is an important element of system take-up in telemedicine and a focus towards qualitative methodology may explore the underlying reasons behind its acceptability. In this paper we have systematically reviewed qualitative studies that include evidence about patient responses to VC services in an orthopaedic setting. Objectives: To determine whether real time 1:1 videoconferencing is acceptable to patients in an orthopaedic setting. Data sources: MEDLINE, AMED, PsychINFO, CINAHL, SCOPUS, Cochrane Database, Evidence Search and Open Grey were searched with forwards and backwards reference screening of eligible papers. Eligibility criteria: Qualitative studies exploring the acceptability of VC in an orthopaedic setting were included. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: Studies were appraised using the CASP tool. A Directed Content Framework Analysis was conducted using Normalisation Process Theory. Results: Four studies were included for review. The themes for the four studies did not overlap and did not report clinician acceptability of VC. The Directed Content Analysis of these papers using Normalisation Process Theory highlighted factors which contribute towards its acceptability. Conclusions: All studies concluded that the use of VC was acceptable. Further qualitative research exploring both patient and clinician acceptability is required utilising a theoretical framework to allow for repeatability and generalisability. Systematic Review Registration Number: PROSPERO CRD42015024944.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 12 December 2017
Keywords: Normalisation Process Theory, Orthopaedics, Real time 1:1 videoconferencing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418901
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418901
ISSN: 0031-9406
PURE UUID: d426d3dc-78e8-46ae-89ec-b361393fc325
ORCID for Carl R. May: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0451-2690

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Mar 2018 17:31
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:58

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