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Building resilience through group visual arts activities: findings from a scoping study with young people who experience mental health complexities and/or learning difficulties

Building resilience through group visual arts activities: findings from a scoping study with young people who experience mental health complexities and/or learning difficulties
Building resilience through group visual arts activities: findings from a scoping study with young people who experience mental health complexities and/or learning difficulties
Summary:

This article reports research that aimed to identify and evaluate potential resilience benefits of visual arts interventions for young people with complex needs. The study involved a review of the ‘arts for resilience’ literature and a case study of 10 weekly resilience-building arts workshops for 10 young people experiencing mental health complexities and/or learning difficulties.

Findings:

We found a significant existing evidence-base linking visual arts practice to individual and community resilience, across disciplinary fields including art therapy, social work, community health, visual arts practice and geographies of health. Visual art activities were utilised to both educate young people about resilience and enhance young people’s overall resilience. Qualitative research material developed from the case study shows that even short-term visual arts interventions can impact on young people’s resilience – crucially, participation was extremely beneficial to young people’s sense of belonging and ability to cope with difficult feelings (topics which arose repeatedly during interview, focus group discussion and observation).

Applications:

Our review and findings from this small case study provide some initial insights into the resilience benefits of participation in visual arts activities. This, combined with the resilience-based practice framework presented here, could aid the effective targeting of interventions for social workers and others working with young people with complex needs. Alongside this research paper, an arts for resilience practice guide has been produced by the project team (including young people). It contains instructions on how to conduct a range of practical visual arts activities that we identified as being resilience-promoting.
Social work, art, belonging, learning disability, mental health, resilience, social exclusion, young people
0019-5634
541-560
Macpherson, Hannah
76b05dd6-a5a8-4aaf-b9b3-645f2acc857a
Hart, Angela
8ac2781b-93f1-41bf-ac89-5852a8bebdbd
Heaver, Becky
f906d7d4-351a-474c-8015-c095e16f1b64
Macpherson, Hannah
76b05dd6-a5a8-4aaf-b9b3-645f2acc857a
Hart, Angela
8ac2781b-93f1-41bf-ac89-5852a8bebdbd
Heaver, Becky
f906d7d4-351a-474c-8015-c095e16f1b64

Macpherson, Hannah, Hart, Angela and Heaver, Becky (2016) Building resilience through group visual arts activities: findings from a scoping study with young people who experience mental health complexities and/or learning difficulties. Indian Journal of Social Work, 16 (5), 541-560. (doi:10.1177/1468017315581772).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Summary:

This article reports research that aimed to identify and evaluate potential resilience benefits of visual arts interventions for young people with complex needs. The study involved a review of the ‘arts for resilience’ literature and a case study of 10 weekly resilience-building arts workshops for 10 young people experiencing mental health complexities and/or learning difficulties.

Findings:

We found a significant existing evidence-base linking visual arts practice to individual and community resilience, across disciplinary fields including art therapy, social work, community health, visual arts practice and geographies of health. Visual art activities were utilised to both educate young people about resilience and enhance young people’s overall resilience. Qualitative research material developed from the case study shows that even short-term visual arts interventions can impact on young people’s resilience – crucially, participation was extremely beneficial to young people’s sense of belonging and ability to cope with difficult feelings (topics which arose repeatedly during interview, focus group discussion and observation).

Applications:

Our review and findings from this small case study provide some initial insights into the resilience benefits of participation in visual arts activities. This, combined with the resilience-based practice framework presented here, could aid the effective targeting of interventions for social workers and others working with young people with complex needs. Alongside this research paper, an arts for resilience practice guide has been produced by the project team (including young people). It contains instructions on how to conduct a range of practical visual arts activities that we identified as being resilience-promoting.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 23 April 2015
Published date: 1 September 2016
Keywords: Social work, art, belonging, learning disability, mental health, resilience, social exclusion, young people

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418919
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418919
ISSN: 0019-5634
PURE UUID: 2bd49cc9-901b-4dfc-8d9f-3f538c6ad748

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:44

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Contributors

Author: Angela Hart
Author: Becky Heaver

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