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Omega-6 fatty acids and inflammation

Omega-6 fatty acids and inflammation
Omega-6 fatty acids and inflammation
Inflammation is a normal process that is part of host defense and tissue healing. However, excessive or unresolved inflammation can lead to uncontrolled tissue damage, pathology and disease. In humans on a Western diet, the omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid (ARA) makes a significant contribution to the fatty acids present in the membrane phospholipids of cells involved in inflammation. ARA is a precursor to a number of potent pro-inflammatory mediators including well described prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which has led to the development of anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals that target the ARA pathway to successfully control inflammation. Hence, it is commonly believed that increasing dietary intake of the omega-6 fatty acids ARA or its precursor linoleic acid (LA) will increase inflammation. However, studies in healthy human adults have found that increased intake of ARA or LA does not increase the concentrations of many inflammatory markers. Epidemiological studies have even suggested that ARA and LA may be linked to reduced inflammation. Contrastingly, there is also evidence that a high omega-6 fatty acid diet inhibits the anti-inflammatory and inflammation-resolving effect of the omega-3 fatty acids. Thus, the interaction of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and their lipid mediators in the context of inflammation is complex and still not properly understood.
0952-3278
41-48
Innes, Jacqueline
32e03dd2-563b-4ff9-873e-600146df12c8
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Innes, Jacqueline
32e03dd2-563b-4ff9-873e-600146df12c8
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Innes, Jacqueline and Calder, Philip (2018) Omega-6 fatty acids and inflammation. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 132, 41-48. (doi:10.1016/j.plefa.2018.03.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Inflammation is a normal process that is part of host defense and tissue healing. However, excessive or unresolved inflammation can lead to uncontrolled tissue damage, pathology and disease. In humans on a Western diet, the omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid (ARA) makes a significant contribution to the fatty acids present in the membrane phospholipids of cells involved in inflammation. ARA is a precursor to a number of potent pro-inflammatory mediators including well described prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which has led to the development of anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals that target the ARA pathway to successfully control inflammation. Hence, it is commonly believed that increasing dietary intake of the omega-6 fatty acids ARA or its precursor linoleic acid (LA) will increase inflammation. However, studies in healthy human adults have found that increased intake of ARA or LA does not increase the concentrations of many inflammatory markers. Epidemiological studies have even suggested that ARA and LA may be linked to reduced inflammation. Contrastingly, there is also evidence that a high omega-6 fatty acid diet inhibits the anti-inflammatory and inflammation-resolving effect of the omega-3 fatty acids. Thus, the interaction of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and their lipid mediators in the context of inflammation is complex and still not properly understood.

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Omega-6 fatty acids and inflammation Final_Revised - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 March 2018
Published date: 1 May 2018
Additional Information: x

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418974
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418974
ISSN: 0952-3278
PURE UUID: 03c00f8c-2413-4972-bb61-3f9a8c45823b
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Mar 2018 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 07:08

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Contributors

Author: Jacqueline Innes
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD

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