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Ureteroscopy for stone disease in paediatric population is safe and effective in medium-volume and high-volume centres: evidence from a systematic review

Ureteroscopy for stone disease in paediatric population is safe and effective in medium-volume and high-volume centres: evidence from a systematic review
Ureteroscopy for stone disease in paediatric population is safe and effective in medium-volume and high-volume centres: evidence from a systematic review

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The incidence of urinary stone disease among the paediatric population is increasing. Whilst there has been a rise in the number of original studies published on ureteroscopy (URS) in children, critical review still remains under-reported.

RECENT FINDINGS: A Cochrane style systematic review was performed to identify all original articles on URS (minimum of 25 cases) for stone disease in paediatric patients between Jan. 1996 and Dec. 2016. Based on the number of reported cases, centres were divided into medium (25-49 cases) and high (≥ 50 cases) volume studies. Thirty-four studies (2758 children) satisfied our search criteria and were included in this review. The mean stone size was 8.6 mm with an overall stone-free rate (SFR) of 90.4% (range 58-100). Medium-volume centres reported a mean SFR of 94.1% (range 87.5-100), whilst high-volume centres reported a mean SFR of 88.1% (range 58-98.5). Mean number of sessions to achieve stone-free status in medium-volume and high-volume groups was 1.1 and 1.2 procedures/patient respectively. The overall complication rate was 11.1% (327/2994). Breakdown by Clavien grade was as follows: Clavien I 69% and Clavien II/III 31%. There were no Clavien IV/V complications, and no mortality was recorded across any of the studies. The overall failure to access rate was 2.5% (76/2944). Medium-volume and high-volume studies had overall complication rates of 6.9% (37/530) and 12.1% (287/2222) respectively, but there was no significant difference in major or minor complications between these two groups. Ureteroscopy is a safe and effective treatment for paediatric stone disease. Medium-volume centres can achieve equally high SFRs and safety profiles as high-volume centres. Despite the rarity of paediatric stone disease, our findings might increase the uptake of paediatric URS procedures.

Journal Article, Review
1534-6285
1-8
Rob, Shazna
af93125f-1704-4e4e-a1df-88aff6c54cab
Jones, Patrick
d27beb5b-0e09-4ed5-89f0-6c62421c2397
Pietropaolo, Amelia
dd6770c4-bf2e-46a9-b7a2-7bd3f9fdba56
Griffin, Stephen
49c409b7-ee50-4809-b6b8-d5e192ff7424
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Rob, Shazna
af93125f-1704-4e4e-a1df-88aff6c54cab
Jones, Patrick
d27beb5b-0e09-4ed5-89f0-6c62421c2397
Pietropaolo, Amelia
dd6770c4-bf2e-46a9-b7a2-7bd3f9fdba56
Griffin, Stephen
49c409b7-ee50-4809-b6b8-d5e192ff7424
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Rob, Shazna, Jones, Patrick, Pietropaolo, Amelia, Griffin, Stephen and Somani, Bhaskar K. (2017) Ureteroscopy for stone disease in paediatric population is safe and effective in medium-volume and high-volume centres: evidence from a systematic review. Current Urology Reports, 18 (12), 1-8, [92]. (doi:10.1007/s11934-017-0742-3).

Record type: Review

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The incidence of urinary stone disease among the paediatric population is increasing. Whilst there has been a rise in the number of original studies published on ureteroscopy (URS) in children, critical review still remains under-reported.

RECENT FINDINGS: A Cochrane style systematic review was performed to identify all original articles on URS (minimum of 25 cases) for stone disease in paediatric patients between Jan. 1996 and Dec. 2016. Based on the number of reported cases, centres were divided into medium (25-49 cases) and high (≥ 50 cases) volume studies. Thirty-four studies (2758 children) satisfied our search criteria and were included in this review. The mean stone size was 8.6 mm with an overall stone-free rate (SFR) of 90.4% (range 58-100). Medium-volume centres reported a mean SFR of 94.1% (range 87.5-100), whilst high-volume centres reported a mean SFR of 88.1% (range 58-98.5). Mean number of sessions to achieve stone-free status in medium-volume and high-volume groups was 1.1 and 1.2 procedures/patient respectively. The overall complication rate was 11.1% (327/2994). Breakdown by Clavien grade was as follows: Clavien I 69% and Clavien II/III 31%. There were no Clavien IV/V complications, and no mortality was recorded across any of the studies. The overall failure to access rate was 2.5% (76/2944). Medium-volume and high-volume studies had overall complication rates of 6.9% (37/530) and 12.1% (287/2222) respectively, but there was no significant difference in major or minor complications between these two groups. Ureteroscopy is a safe and effective treatment for paediatric stone disease. Medium-volume centres can achieve equally high SFRs and safety profiles as high-volume centres. Despite the rarity of paediatric stone disease, our findings might increase the uptake of paediatric URS procedures.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 April 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 October 2017
Published date: 1 December 2017
Keywords: Journal Article, Review

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Local EPrints ID: 418993
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418993
ISSN: 1534-6285
PURE UUID: 768a376e-022c-4616-b646-67e33640c4b6

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2018 16:30
Last modified: 06 Oct 2020 18:20

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