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Contributions of composition and interactions to bacterial respiration are reliant on the phylogenetic similarity of the measured community

Contributions of composition and interactions to bacterial respiration are reliant on the phylogenetic similarity of the measured community
Contributions of composition and interactions to bacterial respiration are reliant on the phylogenetic similarity of the measured community

Bacterial diversity underpins many ecosystem functions; however, the impact of within-species variation on the relationship between diversity and function remains unclear. Processes involving strain differentiation, such as niche radiation, are often overlooked in studies that focus on phylogenetic variation. This study used bacterial isolates assembled in two comparable microcosm experiments to test how species variation affected ecosystem function. We compared the relationship between diversity and activity (CO2 production) in increasingly diverse multispecies microcosms and with multiple ecotypes of a single species. The bacteria used were isolated from a low-diversity environment and are species of potential clinical significance such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All isolates were profiled for single carbon source utilisation. These data showed an increased breadth of resource use in the multiple ecotypes when compared to the mixed-species. The study observed significantly increasing respiration in more complex mixed-species assemblages, which was not observed when ecotypes of a single species were combined. We further demonstrate that the variation observed in the bacterial activity was due to the roles of each of the constituent isolates; between different species, the interactions between the isolates drove the variation in activity, whilst in single species, assemblage variation was due to which isolates were present. We conclude that both between- and within-species variations play different roles in community function, although through different mechanisms, and should be included in models of changing diversity and ecosystem functioning.

Bacterial consortia, Biodiversity-ecosystem function, Carbon utilisation, Intraspecific variation, Niche radiation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
0095-3628
757-760
Rivett, Damian W.
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Lilley, Andrew K.
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Connett, Gary J.
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Carroll, Mary P.
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Legg, Julian P.
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Bruce, Kenneth D.
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Rivett, Damian W.
dd44e46c-42c9-49a1-8ae9-9e1cee01b957
Lilley, Andrew K.
72218d64-8cf6-4c8c-b15d-f9318703075a
Connett, Gary J.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Carroll, Mary P.
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Legg, Julian P.
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Bruce, Kenneth D.
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Rivett, Damian W., Lilley, Andrew K., Connett, Gary J., Carroll, Mary P., Legg, Julian P. and Bruce, Kenneth D. (2017) Contributions of composition and interactions to bacterial respiration are reliant on the phylogenetic similarity of the measured community. Microbial Ecology, 74 (3), 757-760. (doi:10.1007/s00248-017-0982-2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Bacterial diversity underpins many ecosystem functions; however, the impact of within-species variation on the relationship between diversity and function remains unclear. Processes involving strain differentiation, such as niche radiation, are often overlooked in studies that focus on phylogenetic variation. This study used bacterial isolates assembled in two comparable microcosm experiments to test how species variation affected ecosystem function. We compared the relationship between diversity and activity (CO2 production) in increasingly diverse multispecies microcosms and with multiple ecotypes of a single species. The bacteria used were isolated from a low-diversity environment and are species of potential clinical significance such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All isolates were profiled for single carbon source utilisation. These data showed an increased breadth of resource use in the multiple ecotypes when compared to the mixed-species. The study observed significantly increasing respiration in more complex mixed-species assemblages, which was not observed when ecotypes of a single species were combined. We further demonstrate that the variation observed in the bacterial activity was due to the roles of each of the constituent isolates; between different species, the interactions between the isolates drove the variation in activity, whilst in single species, assemblage variation was due to which isolates were present. We conclude that both between- and within-species variations play different roles in community function, although through different mechanisms, and should be included in models of changing diversity and ecosystem functioning.

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Accepted/In Press date: 5 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 April 2017
Published date: 1 October 2017
Keywords: Bacterial consortia, Biodiversity-ecosystem function, Carbon utilisation, Intraspecific variation, Niche radiation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419050
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419050
ISSN: 0095-3628
PURE UUID: 48cb2baf-3f3d-429e-b25d-6bff90750d43
ORCID for Gary J. Connett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1310-3239

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Date deposited: 28 Mar 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:20

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Contributors

Author: Damian W. Rivett
Author: Andrew K. Lilley
Author: Gary J. Connett ORCID iD
Author: Mary P. Carroll
Author: Julian P. Legg
Author: Kenneth D. Bruce

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