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Shock wave lithotripsy outcomes for lower pole and non-lower pole stones from a university teaching hospital: parallel group comparison during the same time period

Shock wave lithotripsy outcomes for lower pole and non-lower pole stones from a university teaching hospital: parallel group comparison during the same time period
Shock wave lithotripsy outcomes for lower pole and non-lower pole stones from a university teaching hospital: parallel group comparison during the same time period

Introduction: Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is a treatment option for all locations of renal and ureteric stones. We compared the results of SWL for lower pole renal stones with all other non-lower pole renal and ureteric stones during the same time period.

Material and Methods: All SWL procedures were carried out as day case procedures by a mobile lithotripter from January 2012 to August 2013. The follow-up imaging was a combination of KUB X-ray or USS. Following SWL treatment, the stone free rate (SFR) was defined as ≤3 mm fragments.

Results: A total of 148 patients with a mean age of 62 years underwent 201 procedures. Of the 201 procedures, 93 (46%) were for lower pole stones. The non-lower pole stones included upper pole (n = 36), mid pole (n = 40), renal pelvis (n = 10), PUJ (n = 8), mid ureter (n = 3), upper ureter (n = 5) and a combination of upper, middle and/or lower pole (n = 6). The mean stone size for lower pole stones (7.4 mm; range: 4-16 mm) was slightly smaller than non-lower pole stones (8 mm; range: 4-17 mm). The stone fragmentation was successful in 124 (62%) of patients. However, the SFR was statistically significantly better (P = 0.023) for non-lower pole stones 43 (40%) compared to lower pole stones 23 (25%). There were 9 (4%) minor complications and this was not significantly different in the two groups.

Conclusions: Although SWL achieves a moderately high stone fragmentation rate with a low complication rate, the SFR is variable depending on the location of stone and the definition of SFR, with lower pole stones fairing significantly worse than stones in all other locations.

Journal Article
2090-5998
46-48
Geraghty, Robert
ef19149e-530f-4749-9740-0902fed96fe1
Burr, Jacob
0fce8a6d-c224-49fa-8b6f-3da29e02f7b2
Simmonds, Nick
58a64ec9-199d-4113-aa23-8a60f1b41b09
Somani, Bhaskar K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Geraghty, Robert
ef19149e-530f-4749-9740-0902fed96fe1
Burr, Jacob
0fce8a6d-c224-49fa-8b6f-3da29e02f7b2
Simmonds, Nick
58a64ec9-199d-4113-aa23-8a60f1b41b09
Somani, Bhaskar K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Geraghty, Robert, Burr, Jacob, Simmonds, Nick and Somani, Bhaskar K (2015) Shock wave lithotripsy outcomes for lower pole and non-lower pole stones from a university teaching hospital: parallel group comparison during the same time period. Arab Journal of Urology, 7 (1), 46-48. (doi:10.4103/0974-7796.148601).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction: Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is a treatment option for all locations of renal and ureteric stones. We compared the results of SWL for lower pole renal stones with all other non-lower pole renal and ureteric stones during the same time period.

Material and Methods: All SWL procedures were carried out as day case procedures by a mobile lithotripter from January 2012 to August 2013. The follow-up imaging was a combination of KUB X-ray or USS. Following SWL treatment, the stone free rate (SFR) was defined as ≤3 mm fragments.

Results: A total of 148 patients with a mean age of 62 years underwent 201 procedures. Of the 201 procedures, 93 (46%) were for lower pole stones. The non-lower pole stones included upper pole (n = 36), mid pole (n = 40), renal pelvis (n = 10), PUJ (n = 8), mid ureter (n = 3), upper ureter (n = 5) and a combination of upper, middle and/or lower pole (n = 6). The mean stone size for lower pole stones (7.4 mm; range: 4-16 mm) was slightly smaller than non-lower pole stones (8 mm; range: 4-17 mm). The stone fragmentation was successful in 124 (62%) of patients. However, the SFR was statistically significantly better (P = 0.023) for non-lower pole stones 43 (40%) compared to lower pole stones 23 (25%). There were 9 (4%) minor complications and this was not significantly different in the two groups.

Conclusions: Although SWL achieves a moderately high stone fragmentation rate with a low complication rate, the SFR is variable depending on the location of stone and the definition of SFR, with lower pole stones fairing significantly worse than stones in all other locations.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 August 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 January 2015
Published date: 7 February 2015
Keywords: Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419121
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419121
ISSN: 2090-5998
PURE UUID: fd3e0f86-0943-4ffd-8e0b-a89aeb99a00b

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Date deposited: 05 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:44

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