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Western canon law in the Central and Later Middle Ages

Western canon law in the Central and Later Middle Ages
Western canon law in the Central and Later Middle Ages
This chapter explores a significant period in the formation, teaching, and application of canon law. Firstly, it marked the emergence of a universal body of Western canon law which remained in force among Catholics down to 1917; and the chapter will survey recent scholarly debate about the development of this corpus of canon law. Secondly, universities appeared and established the systematic teaching and study of canon (and civil) law. Canon law collections were often compiled in this milieu, and university teachers produced commentaries and other literature on this law, which influenced how it was interpreted and applied in practice. Thirdly, regular church courts emerged across Western Europe as fora for settling disputes and prosecuting crimes that came under canon law. These courts formed an international hierarchy with the papal Curia at its apex, the highest ecclesiastical court of appeal, and stretching down to bishops’ and archdeacons’ courts at diocesan level.
Oxford University Press
Clarke, Peter
3889aaf5-80ba-4bad-8a76-10e0715c639e
Pihlajamaki, Heikki
Dubber, Markus
Godfrey, Mark
Clarke, Peter
3889aaf5-80ba-4bad-8a76-10e0715c639e
Pihlajamaki, Heikki
Dubber, Markus
Godfrey, Mark

Clarke, Peter (2018) Western canon law in the Central and Later Middle Ages. In, Pihlajamaki, Heikki, Dubber, Markus and Godfrey, Mark (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of European Legal History. (Oxford Handbooks) Oxford. Oxford University Press.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

This chapter explores a significant period in the formation, teaching, and application of canon law. Firstly, it marked the emergence of a universal body of Western canon law which remained in force among Catholics down to 1917; and the chapter will survey recent scholarly debate about the development of this corpus of canon law. Secondly, universities appeared and established the systematic teaching and study of canon (and civil) law. Canon law collections were often compiled in this milieu, and university teachers produced commentaries and other literature on this law, which influenced how it was interpreted and applied in practice. Thirdly, regular church courts emerged across Western Europe as fora for settling disputes and prosecuting crimes that came under canon law. These courts formed an international hierarchy with the papal Curia at its apex, the highest ecclesiastical court of appeal, and stretching down to bishops’ and archdeacons’ courts at diocesan level.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 March 2018
Published date: 19 July 2018
Additional Information: Chapter 12

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419228
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419228
PURE UUID: fb3efbf3-7ea7-4d38-a381-2b89da923419

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Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Peter Clarke
Editor: Heikki Pihlajamaki
Editor: Markus Dubber
Editor: Mark Godfrey

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