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Adult height is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: a Mendelian randomisation study

Adult height is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: a Mendelian randomisation study
Adult height is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: a Mendelian randomisation study
Background:

Observational studies suggest greater height is associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, but cannot exclude bias and/or confounding as explanations for this. Mendelian randomisation (MR) can provide evidence which may be less prone to bias.

Methods:

We pooled data from 39 Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium studies (16,395 cases; 23,003 controls). We applied two-stage predictor-substitution MR, using a weighted genetic risk score combining 609 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Study-specific odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between genetically predicted height and risk were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis.

Results:

Greater genetically predicted height was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk overall (pooled-OR (pOR) = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01–1.11 per 5 cm increase in height), and separately for invasive (pOR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01–1.11) and borderline (pOR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.02–1.29) tumours.

Conclusions:

Women with a genetic propensity to being taller have increased risk of ovarian cancer. This suggests genes influencing height are involved in pathways promoting ovarian carcinogenesis.
0007-0920
Eccles, Diana
5b59bc73-11c9-4cf0-a9d5-7a8e523eee23
Dixon-Suen, Suzanne C.
d3336826-4358-463e-bd10-618350707873
et al.
on behalf of the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium
Eccles, Diana
5b59bc73-11c9-4cf0-a9d5-7a8e523eee23
Dixon-Suen, Suzanne C.
d3336826-4358-463e-bd10-618350707873

Eccles, Diana and Dixon-Suen, Suzanne C. , et al. and on behalf of the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (2018) Adult height is associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer: a Mendelian randomisation study. British Journal of Cancer. (doi:10.1038/s41416-018-0011-3).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background:

Observational studies suggest greater height is associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, but cannot exclude bias and/or confounding as explanations for this. Mendelian randomisation (MR) can provide evidence which may be less prone to bias.

Methods:

We pooled data from 39 Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium studies (16,395 cases; 23,003 controls). We applied two-stage predictor-substitution MR, using a weighted genetic risk score combining 609 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Study-specific odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between genetically predicted height and risk were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis.

Results:

Greater genetically predicted height was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk overall (pooled-OR (pOR) = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01–1.11 per 5 cm increase in height), and separately for invasive (pOR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01–1.11) and borderline (pOR = 1.15; 95% CI: 1.02–1.29) tumours.

Conclusions:

Women with a genetic propensity to being taller have increased risk of ovarian cancer. This suggests genes influencing height are involved in pathways promoting ovarian carcinogenesis.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419231
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419231
ISSN: 0007-0920
PURE UUID: 00638f56-25af-4f2b-868a-4a42a3285bbc

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Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 11:56

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Contributors

Author: Diana Eccles
Author: Suzanne C. Dixon-Suen

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