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The association of metabolic syndrome and urolithiasis

The association of metabolic syndrome and urolithiasis
The association of metabolic syndrome and urolithiasis

There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

Journal Article, Review
1687-8337
570674
Wong, Yee V
ca39615d-1e1d-49de-ac15-a387fd32af21
Cook, Paul
538d8580-5ef0-4644-8dc4-733f5014e4c8
Somani, Bhaskar K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Wong, Yee V
ca39615d-1e1d-49de-ac15-a387fd32af21
Cook, Paul
538d8580-5ef0-4644-8dc4-733f5014e4c8
Somani, Bhaskar K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Wong, Yee V, Cook, Paul and Somani, Bhaskar K (2015) The association of metabolic syndrome and urolithiasis. International Journal of Endocrinology, 2015, 570674. (doi:10.1155/2015/570674).

Record type: Review

Abstract

There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

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Published date: 2015
Keywords: Journal Article, Review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419237
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419237
ISSN: 1687-8337
PURE UUID: 3582d363-b926-47ef-8b41-22e10f0bc009

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Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 20 Mar 2020 17:31

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