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Outcome-based comparison of percutaneous procedures for urinary lithiasis with calibre of instrumentation less than 12Fr

Outcome-based comparison of percutaneous procedures for urinary lithiasis with calibre of instrumentation less than 12Fr
Outcome-based comparison of percutaneous procedures for urinary lithiasis with calibre of instrumentation less than 12Fr

Renal stone disease is becoming increasingly prevalent globally. With a rise in stone disease worldwide, there is also a relative increase in the rates of surgical intervention. Technological advances have allowed a move towards minimising the complications rates and length of stay with a reduction in invasiveness and size of instruments. A trend for minimising the percutaneous tract size has been noted in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal stones. The management has shifted from open surgery to standard PCNL, mini-PCNL and the latest ultra-mini and micro-PCNL techniques. There is a need to compare outcomes for the ever-advancing technologies, such as the smaller calibre of instruments, to assess risk-benefit in practice. This review looks at outcome-based comparison of percutaneous procedures for urinary lithiasis with instruments <12Fr in size.

Humans, Kidney Calculi, Length of Stay, Nephrostomy, Percutaneous, Postoperative Complications, Treatment Outcome, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Review
1534-6285
53
Wells, H
31a6f582-422b-4305-8961-e3b01fe62429
Rukin, N
b7ecb316-6d30-4889-87f4-fb50cd5a19fa
Wright, A
ac8c0770-0b1b-4235-996b-5a3d314e9117
Somani, B K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Wells, H
31a6f582-422b-4305-8961-e3b01fe62429
Rukin, N
b7ecb316-6d30-4889-87f4-fb50cd5a19fa
Wright, A
ac8c0770-0b1b-4235-996b-5a3d314e9117
Somani, B K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Wells, H, Rukin, N, Wright, A and Somani, B K (2015) Outcome-based comparison of percutaneous procedures for urinary lithiasis with calibre of instrumentation less than 12Fr. Current Urology Reports, 16 (8), 53. (doi:10.1007/s11934-015-0528-4).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Renal stone disease is becoming increasingly prevalent globally. With a rise in stone disease worldwide, there is also a relative increase in the rates of surgical intervention. Technological advances have allowed a move towards minimising the complications rates and length of stay with a reduction in invasiveness and size of instruments. A trend for minimising the percutaneous tract size has been noted in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for renal stones. The management has shifted from open surgery to standard PCNL, mini-PCNL and the latest ultra-mini and micro-PCNL techniques. There is a need to compare outcomes for the ever-advancing technologies, such as the smaller calibre of instruments, to assess risk-benefit in practice. This review looks at outcome-based comparison of percutaneous procedures for urinary lithiasis with instruments <12Fr in size.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 17 June 2015
Published date: August 2015
Keywords: Humans, Kidney Calculi, Length of Stay, Nephrostomy, Percutaneous, Postoperative Complications, Treatment Outcome, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419239
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419239
ISSN: 1534-6285
PURE UUID: ad1d02bd-a614-4343-80f8-cb7719980857

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Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:44

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Contributors

Author: H Wells
Author: N Rukin
Author: A Wright
Author: B K Somani

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