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Effect of playing video games on laparoscopic skills performance: a systematic review

Effect of playing video games on laparoscopic skills performance: a systematic review
Effect of playing video games on laparoscopic skills performance: a systematic review

Background and Purpose:  the advances in both video games and minimally invasive surgery have allowed many to consider the potential positive relationship between the two. This review aims to evaluate outcomes of studies that investigated the correlation between video game skills and performance in laparoscopic surgery.

Methods:   a systematic search was conducted on PubMed/Medline and EMBASE databases for the MeSH terms and keywords including “video games and laparoscopy,” “computer games and laparoscopy,” “Xbox and laparoscopy,” “Nintendo Wii and laparoscopy,” and “PlayStation and laparoscopy.” Cohort, case reports, letters, editorials, bulletins, and reviews were excluded. Studies in English, with task performance as primary outcome, were included. The search period for this review was 1950 to December 2014.

Results:   there were 57 abstracts identified: 4 of these were found to be duplicates; 32 were found to be nonrelevant to the research question. Overall, 21 full texts were assessed; 15 were excluded according to the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument quality assessment criteria. The five studies included in this review were randomized controlled trials. Playing video games was found to reduce error in two studies (P 0.002 and P 0.045). For the same studies, however, several other metrics assessed were not significantly different between the control and intervention group. One study showed a decrease in the time for the group that played video games (P 0.037) for one of two laparoscopic tasks performed. In the same study, however, when the groups were reversed (initial control group became intervention and vice versa), a difference was not demonstrated (P for peg transfer 1 – 0.465, P for cobra robe – 0.185). Finally, two further studies found no statistical difference between the game playing group and the control group's performance.

Conclusion:  there is a very limited amount of evidence to support that the use of video games enhances surgical simulation performance.

Clinical Competence, Computer Simulation, Education, Medical, Humans, Laparoscopy, Simulation Training, Task Performance and Analysis, Video Games, Journal Article, Review
0892-7790
146-152
Glassman, Daniel
bf20ed65-1a9d-4539-b808-ce27daadb48f
Yiasemidou, Marina
d2223590-781a-40b8-a04b-2250cda72895
Ishii, Hiro
d2dd0ce3-0ccd-4cb4-8aa1-f6d363e29b90
Somani, Bhaskar Kumar
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Ahmed, Kamran
caefe3f7-3dd4-4b9b-9be2-e1a1f9f2445a
Biyani, Chandra Shekhar
2d96e24e-f3f3-4ba5-8258-73ba26f63321
Glassman, Daniel
bf20ed65-1a9d-4539-b808-ce27daadb48f
Yiasemidou, Marina
d2223590-781a-40b8-a04b-2250cda72895
Ishii, Hiro
d2dd0ce3-0ccd-4cb4-8aa1-f6d363e29b90
Somani, Bhaskar Kumar
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Ahmed, Kamran
caefe3f7-3dd4-4b9b-9be2-e1a1f9f2445a
Biyani, Chandra Shekhar
2d96e24e-f3f3-4ba5-8258-73ba26f63321

Glassman, Daniel, Yiasemidou, Marina, Ishii, Hiro, Somani, Bhaskar Kumar, Ahmed, Kamran and Biyani, Chandra Shekhar (2016) Effect of playing video games on laparoscopic skills performance: a systematic review. Journal of Endourology, 30 (2), 146-152. (doi:10.1089/end.2015.0425).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Background and Purpose:  the advances in both video games and minimally invasive surgery have allowed many to consider the potential positive relationship between the two. This review aims to evaluate outcomes of studies that investigated the correlation between video game skills and performance in laparoscopic surgery.

Methods:   a systematic search was conducted on PubMed/Medline and EMBASE databases for the MeSH terms and keywords including “video games and laparoscopy,” “computer games and laparoscopy,” “Xbox and laparoscopy,” “Nintendo Wii and laparoscopy,” and “PlayStation and laparoscopy.” Cohort, case reports, letters, editorials, bulletins, and reviews were excluded. Studies in English, with task performance as primary outcome, were included. The search period for this review was 1950 to December 2014.

Results:   there were 57 abstracts identified: 4 of these were found to be duplicates; 32 were found to be nonrelevant to the research question. Overall, 21 full texts were assessed; 15 were excluded according to the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument quality assessment criteria. The five studies included in this review were randomized controlled trials. Playing video games was found to reduce error in two studies (P 0.002 and P 0.045). For the same studies, however, several other metrics assessed were not significantly different between the control and intervention group. One study showed a decrease in the time for the group that played video games (P 0.037) for one of two laparoscopic tasks performed. In the same study, however, when the groups were reversed (initial control group became intervention and vice versa), a difference was not demonstrated (P for peg transfer 1 – 0.465, P for cobra robe – 0.185). Finally, two further studies found no statistical difference between the game playing group and the control group's performance.

Conclusion:  there is a very limited amount of evidence to support that the use of video games enhances surgical simulation performance.

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More information

Published date: February 2016
Keywords: Clinical Competence, Computer Simulation, Education, Medical, Humans, Laparoscopy, Simulation Training, Task Performance and Analysis, Video Games, Journal Article, Review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419245
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419245
ISSN: 0892-7790
PURE UUID: 9e8c8712-f531-4c47-9df7-2511579462af

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:44

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Contributors

Author: Daniel Glassman
Author: Marina Yiasemidou
Author: Hiro Ishii
Author: Kamran Ahmed
Author: Chandra Shekhar Biyani

University divisions

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