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Outcomes of ureteroscopy for patients with stones in a solitary kidney: evidence from a systematic review

Outcomes of ureteroscopy for patients with stones in a solitary kidney: evidence from a systematic review
Outcomes of ureteroscopy for patients with stones in a solitary kidney: evidence from a systematic review

Introduction: management of urolithiasis in a solitary functioning kidney can be clinically challenging. The aim of this article was to review the outcomes of URS for patients with stone disease in a solitary kidney and critically appraise the existing evidence and outcome reporting standards.

Material and methods: we conducted a systematic review in line with PRISMA checklist and Cochrane guidelines between January 1980 and February 2015. Our inclusion criteria were all English language articles reporting on a minimum of 10 patients with a solitary kidney undergoing ureteroscopy for stone disease.

Results: a total of 116 patients (mean age 50 years) underwent URS for stones in solitary kidney. For a mean stone size of 16.8 mm (range: 5-60 mm) and 1.23 procedures/patient, the mean stone free rate was 87%. No significant change in renal function was recorded in any of the studies although a transient elevation in creatinine was reported in 10 (8.6%) patients. A total of 33 (28%) complications were recorded a majority (n = 21) of which were Clavien grade I. The Clavien grade II/III complications as reported by authors were urosepsis, steinstrasse and renal colic. None of the procedures required conversion to open surgery with no cases of renal haematoma or ureteric perforation.

Conclusions: this contemporary review highlights URS as a viable treatment option for stone disease in patients with a solitary kidney. It is associated with superior clearance rates to SWL and fewer high-risk complications compared to PCNL.

Journal Article, Review
2080-4806
83-90
Jones, Patrick
d27beb5b-0e09-4ed5-89f0-6c62421c2397
Rai, Bhavan Prasad
e1156207-bfd1-4f89-b0aa-9e55fc54235b
Somani, Bhaskar K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Jones, Patrick
d27beb5b-0e09-4ed5-89f0-6c62421c2397
Rai, Bhavan Prasad
e1156207-bfd1-4f89-b0aa-9e55fc54235b
Somani, Bhaskar K
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Jones, Patrick, Rai, Bhavan Prasad and Somani, Bhaskar K (2016) Outcomes of ureteroscopy for patients with stones in a solitary kidney: evidence from a systematic review. Central European Journal of Urology, 69 (1), 83-90. (doi:10.5173/ceju.2016.663).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Introduction: management of urolithiasis in a solitary functioning kidney can be clinically challenging. The aim of this article was to review the outcomes of URS for patients with stone disease in a solitary kidney and critically appraise the existing evidence and outcome reporting standards.

Material and methods: we conducted a systematic review in line with PRISMA checklist and Cochrane guidelines between January 1980 and February 2015. Our inclusion criteria were all English language articles reporting on a minimum of 10 patients with a solitary kidney undergoing ureteroscopy for stone disease.

Results: a total of 116 patients (mean age 50 years) underwent URS for stones in solitary kidney. For a mean stone size of 16.8 mm (range: 5-60 mm) and 1.23 procedures/patient, the mean stone free rate was 87%. No significant change in renal function was recorded in any of the studies although a transient elevation in creatinine was reported in 10 (8.6%) patients. A total of 33 (28%) complications were recorded a majority (n = 21) of which were Clavien grade I. The Clavien grade II/III complications as reported by authors were urosepsis, steinstrasse and renal colic. None of the procedures required conversion to open surgery with no cases of renal haematoma or ureteric perforation.

Conclusions: this contemporary review highlights URS as a viable treatment option for stone disease in patients with a solitary kidney. It is associated with superior clearance rates to SWL and fewer high-risk complications compared to PCNL.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 25 January 2016
Keywords: Journal Article, Review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419256
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419256
ISSN: 2080-4806
PURE UUID: 00e5a4cf-a5e2-470c-af65-c3aa44a0e506

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Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:44

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