The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The dramatic size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies

The dramatic size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies
The dramatic size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies
We aim to provide a holistic view on the typical size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) that encompasses their high-z star-forming progenitors, their high-z quiescent counterparts, and their configurations in the local Universe. Our investigation covers the main processes playing a relevant role in the cosmic evolution of ETGs. Specifically, their early fast evolution comprises biased collapse of the low angular momentum gaseous baryons located in the inner regions of the host dark matter halo; cooling, fragmentation, and infall of the gas down to the radius set by the centrifugal barrier; further rapid compaction via clump/gas migration toward the galaxy center, where strong heavily dust-enshrouded star formation takes place and most of the stellar mass is accumulated; and ejection of substantial gas amount from the inner regions by feedback processes, which causes a dramatic puffing-up of the stellar component. In the late slow evolution, passive aging of stellar populations and mass additions by dry merger events occur. We describe these processes relying on prescriptions inspired by basic physical arguments and by numerical simulations to derive new analytical estimates of the relevant sizes, timescales, and kinematic properties for individual galaxies along their evolution. Then we obtain quantitative results as a function of galaxy mass and redshift, and compare them to recent observational constraints on half-light size R e , on the ratio v/σ between rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (for gas and stars) and on the specific angular momentum j sstarf of the stellar component; we find good consistency with the available multiband data in average values and dispersion, both for local ETGs and for their z ~ 1–2 star-forming and quiescent progenitors. The outcomes of our analysis can provide hints to gauge sub-grid recipes implemented in simulations, to tune numerical experiments focused on specific processes, and to plan future multiband, high-resolution observations on high-redshift star-forming and quiescent galaxies with next-generation facilities.
0004-637X
Lapi, A.
7e92f844-db1f-4d93-b7cb-d81b8a4648b1
Pantoni, L.
62c4ad74-3ab1-435d-9c5e-6ecce6bca3b6
Zanisi, L.
87405729-1792-4919-a0de-fc92ea450edb
Shi, J.
87b92ef3-b856-4188-b049-907a40f0595f
Mancuso, C.
2171a843-1f72-4818-940c-a6b18863d75d
Massardi, M.
bf950d22-08f2-47f2-9907-392281d26899
Shankar, F.
b10c91e4-85cd-4394-a18a-d4f049fd9cdb
Bressen, A.
1cc51e2f-ff1e-42bb-baad-440192064630
Danese, L.
b9f62c31-0d7d-4751-95ae-49e397270413
Lapi, A.
7e92f844-db1f-4d93-b7cb-d81b8a4648b1
Pantoni, L.
62c4ad74-3ab1-435d-9c5e-6ecce6bca3b6
Zanisi, L.
87405729-1792-4919-a0de-fc92ea450edb
Shi, J.
87b92ef3-b856-4188-b049-907a40f0595f
Mancuso, C.
2171a843-1f72-4818-940c-a6b18863d75d
Massardi, M.
bf950d22-08f2-47f2-9907-392281d26899
Shankar, F.
b10c91e4-85cd-4394-a18a-d4f049fd9cdb
Bressen, A.
1cc51e2f-ff1e-42bb-baad-440192064630
Danese, L.
b9f62c31-0d7d-4751-95ae-49e397270413

Lapi, A., Pantoni, L., Zanisi, L., Shi, J., Mancuso, C., Massardi, M., Shankar, F., Bressen, A. and Danese, L. (2018) The dramatic size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies. The Astrophysical Journal, 857 (1), [22].

Record type: Article

Abstract

We aim to provide a holistic view on the typical size and kinematic evolution of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) that encompasses their high-z star-forming progenitors, their high-z quiescent counterparts, and their configurations in the local Universe. Our investigation covers the main processes playing a relevant role in the cosmic evolution of ETGs. Specifically, their early fast evolution comprises biased collapse of the low angular momentum gaseous baryons located in the inner regions of the host dark matter halo; cooling, fragmentation, and infall of the gas down to the radius set by the centrifugal barrier; further rapid compaction via clump/gas migration toward the galaxy center, where strong heavily dust-enshrouded star formation takes place and most of the stellar mass is accumulated; and ejection of substantial gas amount from the inner regions by feedback processes, which causes a dramatic puffing-up of the stellar component. In the late slow evolution, passive aging of stellar populations and mass additions by dry merger events occur. We describe these processes relying on prescriptions inspired by basic physical arguments and by numerical simulations to derive new analytical estimates of the relevant sizes, timescales, and kinematic properties for individual galaxies along their evolution. Then we obtain quantitative results as a function of galaxy mass and redshift, and compare them to recent observational constraints on half-light size R e , on the ratio v/σ between rotation velocity and velocity dispersion (for gas and stars) and on the specific angular momentum j sstarf of the stellar component; we find good consistency with the available multiband data in average values and dispersion, both for local ETGs and for their z ~ 1–2 star-forming and quiescent progenitors. The outcomes of our analysis can provide hints to gauge sub-grid recipes implemented in simulations, to tune numerical experiments focused on specific processes, and to plan future multiband, high-resolution observations on high-redshift star-forming and quiescent galaxies with next-generation facilities.

Text
1803.04734 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 April 2018
Additional Information: 2018arXiv180304734L

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419264
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419264
ISSN: 0004-637X
PURE UUID: a3689776-d2b0-49a8-abeb-b7149e52314d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 05:32

Export record

Contributors

Author: A. Lapi
Author: L. Pantoni
Author: L. Zanisi
Author: J. Shi
Author: C. Mancuso
Author: M. Massardi
Author: F. Shankar
Author: A. Bressen
Author: L. Danese

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×