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Obesity, inflammation, toll-like Receptor 4 and fatty acids

Obesity, inflammation, toll-like Receptor 4 and fatty acids
Obesity, inflammation, toll-like Receptor 4 and fatty acids
Obesity leads to an inflammatory condition that is directly involved in the etiology of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and certain types of cancer. The classic inflammatory response is an acute reaction to infections or to tissue injuries, and it tends to move towards resolution and homeostasis. However, the inflammatory process that was observed in individuals affected by obesity and metabolic syndrome differs from the classical inflammatory response in certain respects. This inflammatory process manifests itself systemically and it is characterized by a chronic low-intensity reaction. The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is acknowledged as one of the main triggers of the obesity-induced inflammatory response. The aim of the present review is to describe the role that is played by the TLR4 signaling pathway in the inflammatory response and its modulation by saturated and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies indicate that saturated fatty acids can induce inflammation by activating the TLR4 signaling pathway. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, exert anti-inflammatory actions through the attenuation of the activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway by either lipopolysaccharides or saturated fatty acids.
Rogero, Marcelo Macedo
f85ebff9-d9a2-479c-a0e8-17bc63719f56
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Rogero, Marcelo Macedo
f85ebff9-d9a2-479c-a0e8-17bc63719f56
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6

Rogero, Marcelo Macedo and Calder, Philip (2018) Obesity, inflammation, toll-like Receptor 4 and fatty acids. Nutrients, 10 (4), [432]. (doi:10.3390/nu10040432).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Obesity leads to an inflammatory condition that is directly involved in the etiology of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and certain types of cancer. The classic inflammatory response is an acute reaction to infections or to tissue injuries, and it tends to move towards resolution and homeostasis. However, the inflammatory process that was observed in individuals affected by obesity and metabolic syndrome differs from the classical inflammatory response in certain respects. This inflammatory process manifests itself systemically and it is characterized by a chronic low-intensity reaction. The toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway is acknowledged as one of the main triggers of the obesity-induced inflammatory response. The aim of the present review is to describe the role that is played by the TLR4 signaling pathway in the inflammatory response and its modulation by saturated and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies indicate that saturated fatty acids can induce inflammation by activating the TLR4 signaling pathway. Conversely, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, such as eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, exert anti-inflammatory actions through the attenuation of the activation of the TLR4 signaling pathway by either lipopolysaccharides or saturated fatty acids.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 March 2018
Published date: April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419311
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419311
PURE UUID: bdc627cc-fca8-4281-bad5-8c8954d84961
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

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Date deposited: 10 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:38

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Contributors

Author: Marcelo Macedo Rogero
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD

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