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Associations between objectively measured physical activity, body composition and sarcopenia: findings from the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study (HSS)

Associations between objectively measured physical activity, body composition and sarcopenia: findings from the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study (HSS)
Associations between objectively measured physical activity, body composition and sarcopenia: findings from the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study (HSS)
Regular physical activity (PA) is associated with reduced risk of the development and progression of musculoskeletal, metabolic and vascular disease. However, PA declines with age and this can contribute to multiple adverse outcomes. The aims of this study were to describe the relationship between accelerometer-determined PA, body composition and sarcopenia (the loss of muscle mass and function with age). Seven-day PA was measured using the GENEactiv accelerometer among 32 men and 99 women aged 74–84 years who participated in the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study. We measured mean daily acceleration and minutes/day spent in non-sedentary and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, muscle strength by grip dynamometry and function by gait speed. Sarcopenia was defined according to the EWGSOP diagnostic algorithm. Men and women spent a median (inter-quartile range) of 138.8 (82, 217) and 186 (122, 240) minutes/day engaging in non-sedentary activity but only 14.3 (1.8, 30.2) and 9.5 (2.1, 18.6) min in MVPA, respectively. Higher levels of PA were associated with reduced adiposity, faster walking speed and decreased risk of sarcopenia. For example, a standard deviation (SD) increase in mean daily acceleration was associated with an increase in walking speed of 0.25 (95% CI 0.05, 0.45) SDs and a reduction in the risk of sarcopenia of 35% (95% CI 1, 57%) in fully adjusted analyses. PA was not associated with hand grip strength. Community-dwelling older adults in this study were largely sedentary but there was evidence that higher levels of activity were associated with reduced adiposity and improved function. PA at all intensity levels in later life may help maintain physical function and protect against sarcopenia.
0171-967X
Westbury, Leo D.
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Dodds, Richard M.
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Syddall, Holly E.
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Baczynska, Alicja M.
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Shaw, Sarah C.
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Dennison, Elaine M.
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Roberts, Helen C.
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Aihie Sayer, Avan
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Cooper, Cyrus
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Patel, Harnish P.
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Westbury, Leo D.
5ed45df3-3df7-4bf9-bbad-07b63cd4b281
Dodds, Richard M.
2f7c0dea-4cd7-4f91-9fd2-a5ff20706870
Syddall, Holly E.
a0181a93-8fc3-4998-a996-7963f0128328
Baczynska, Alicja M.
88ab8281-44cb-4d45-b86c-df92716ef943
Shaw, Sarah C.
9629b12a-8ee2-4483-a9ca-6efb4eef74c8
Dennison, Elaine M.
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Roberts, Helen C.
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Aihie Sayer, Avan
fb4c2053-6d51-4fc1-9489-c3cb431b0ffb
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Patel, Harnish P.
e1c0826f-d14e-49f3-8049-5b945d185523

Westbury, Leo D., Dodds, Richard M., Syddall, Holly E., Baczynska, Alicja M., Shaw, Sarah C., Dennison, Elaine M., Roberts, Helen C., Aihie Sayer, Avan, Cooper, Cyrus and Patel, Harnish P. (2018) Associations between objectively measured physical activity, body composition and sarcopenia: findings from the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study (HSS). Calcified Tissue International. (doi:10.1007/s00223-018-0413-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Regular physical activity (PA) is associated with reduced risk of the development and progression of musculoskeletal, metabolic and vascular disease. However, PA declines with age and this can contribute to multiple adverse outcomes. The aims of this study were to describe the relationship between accelerometer-determined PA, body composition and sarcopenia (the loss of muscle mass and function with age). Seven-day PA was measured using the GENEactiv accelerometer among 32 men and 99 women aged 74–84 years who participated in the Hertfordshire Sarcopenia Study. We measured mean daily acceleration and minutes/day spent in non-sedentary and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, muscle strength by grip dynamometry and function by gait speed. Sarcopenia was defined according to the EWGSOP diagnostic algorithm. Men and women spent a median (inter-quartile range) of 138.8 (82, 217) and 186 (122, 240) minutes/day engaging in non-sedentary activity but only 14.3 (1.8, 30.2) and 9.5 (2.1, 18.6) min in MVPA, respectively. Higher levels of PA were associated with reduced adiposity, faster walking speed and decreased risk of sarcopenia. For example, a standard deviation (SD) increase in mean daily acceleration was associated with an increase in walking speed of 0.25 (95% CI 0.05, 0.45) SDs and a reduction in the risk of sarcopenia of 35% (95% CI 1, 57%) in fully adjusted analyses. PA was not associated with hand grip strength. Community-dwelling older adults in this study were largely sedentary but there was evidence that higher levels of activity were associated with reduced adiposity and improved function. PA at all intensity levels in later life may help maintain physical function and protect against sarcopenia.

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Accepted/In Press date: 16 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419315
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419315
ISSN: 0171-967X
PURE UUID: 9f7552f7-4ef7-4eba-b9c7-9e7bade79122
ORCID for Richard M. Dodds: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4968-7678
ORCID for Holly E. Syddall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0171-0306
ORCID for Elaine M. Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961
ORCID for Helen C. Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709

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Date deposited: 10 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:54

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