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Metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease: A systematic review of literature

Metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease: A systematic review of literature
Metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease: A systematic review of literature

INTRODUCTION: Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980 with more than 600 million obese patients in 2014. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is the co-occurrence of metabolic abnormalities, including centrally distributed obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. With a concurrent rise in the incidence of kidney stone disease, we wanted to conduct a systematic review focused on the association of MetS to nephrolithiasis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review was performed according to the Cochrane and preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines on all English language articles for the following relevant keywords: association, metabolic syndrome, metabolic syndrome traits, syndrome X, nephrolithiasis, kidney stones, and renal calculi. Our inclusion criteria were studies comparing the prevalence of kidney stone disease in patients with and without MetS.

RESULTS: The initial literature search identified 355 potentially relevant studies. After screening, 22 full text articles were reviewed and 6 (219,255 patients) were included in the final review. All studies displayed increasing odds of nephrolithiasis with increasing number of MetS traits, where patients with three or more MetS traits tended to have a higher prevalence of nephrolithiasis. Studies also showed different significant components of MetS contributing to nephrolithiasis.

CONCLUSIONS: Our review shows a definite association of MetS with kidney stone disease. Although multifactorial in etiology, lifestyle and dietary factors seem to be increasingly important in prevention of stone disease.

Humans, Kidney Calculi, Metabolic Syndrome, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Journal Article, Review
0892-7790
246-253
Wong, Yee
53ab9d25-569d-4c5e-921f-6f65e78d6d3b
Cook, Paul
538d8580-5ef0-4644-8dc4-733f5014e4c8
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Wong, Yee
53ab9d25-569d-4c5e-921f-6f65e78d6d3b
Cook, Paul
538d8580-5ef0-4644-8dc4-733f5014e4c8
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Wong, Yee, Cook, Paul, Roderick, Paul and Somani, Bhaskar K. (2016) Metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease: A systematic review of literature. Journal of Endourology, 30 (3), 246-253. (doi:10.1089/end.2015.0567).

Record type: Review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980 with more than 600 million obese patients in 2014. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is the co-occurrence of metabolic abnormalities, including centrally distributed obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia. With a concurrent rise in the incidence of kidney stone disease, we wanted to conduct a systematic review focused on the association of MetS to nephrolithiasis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review was performed according to the Cochrane and preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines on all English language articles for the following relevant keywords: association, metabolic syndrome, metabolic syndrome traits, syndrome X, nephrolithiasis, kidney stones, and renal calculi. Our inclusion criteria were studies comparing the prevalence of kidney stone disease in patients with and without MetS.

RESULTS: The initial literature search identified 355 potentially relevant studies. After screening, 22 full text articles were reviewed and 6 (219,255 patients) were included in the final review. All studies displayed increasing odds of nephrolithiasis with increasing number of MetS traits, where patients with three or more MetS traits tended to have a higher prevalence of nephrolithiasis. Studies also showed different significant components of MetS contributing to nephrolithiasis.

CONCLUSIONS: Our review shows a definite association of MetS with kidney stone disease. Although multifactorial in etiology, lifestyle and dietary factors seem to be increasingly important in prevention of stone disease.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 22 January 2016
Published date: March 2016
Keywords: Humans, Kidney Calculi, Metabolic Syndrome, Odds Ratio, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Journal Article, Review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419375
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419375
ISSN: 0892-7790
PURE UUID: 69f8bd21-2d55-428d-a2b9-cdd467e4b8c8
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 15 Oct 2019 00:53

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