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Worldwide impact of warmer seasons on the incidence of renal colic and kidney stone disease: Evidence from a systematic review of literature

Worldwide impact of warmer seasons on the incidence of renal colic and kidney stone disease: Evidence from a systematic review of literature
Worldwide impact of warmer seasons on the incidence of renal colic and kidney stone disease: Evidence from a systematic review of literature

INTRODUCTION: Several studies have examined the link between temperature or monthly seasonal variations and urolithiasis. The majority of these studies have demonstrated a link between higher ambient monthly temperatures and the incidence of renal colic and kidney stone disease (KSD). However, a worldwide trend on this association has not been explored and we perform a systematic review to examine the effect of seasonal variations on renal colic and KSD.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the literature for a 26-year period (1990-2017) was conducted on all studies reporting on the effect of seasonal variations and its link to KSD. Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each study, which were analyzed using SPSS version 24.

RESULTS: A total of 59 studies were identified, and after screening, 13 were included in this review. The studies ranged in duration from 1 to 9 years (mean: 5.5 years) and included seasonal/monthly variations for proven stones or lithotripsy treatments or emergency department presentations with renal colic. Except for one study, there was a statistically significant association between higher monthly mean temperatures and the incidence of KSD-related events reported from the United Kingdom, South Korea, the United States, Saudi Arabia, Italy, Spain, Taiwan, Japan, and New Zealand.

CONCLUSIONS: Worldwide trends on the incidence of renal colic and KSD seem be affected by seasonal variation favoring warmer months, with data suggesting that higher ambient temperature has an association with KSD.

Journal Article
0892-7790
729-735
Geraghty, Robert M.
65977705-49f3-48b7-8a80-a86c26955755
Proietti, Silvia
7f914fa5-58b1-4a55-9a48-4c995d26f512
Traxer, Olivier
2fa78817-b6f8-4f00-b389-c9c9ddbd01f3
Archer, Matthew
3aad5aa0-1413-4164-a07c-b2a49faf6e85
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Geraghty, Robert M.
65977705-49f3-48b7-8a80-a86c26955755
Proietti, Silvia
7f914fa5-58b1-4a55-9a48-4c995d26f512
Traxer, Olivier
2fa78817-b6f8-4f00-b389-c9c9ddbd01f3
Archer, Matthew
3aad5aa0-1413-4164-a07c-b2a49faf6e85
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Geraghty, Robert M., Proietti, Silvia, Traxer, Olivier, Archer, Matthew and Somani, Bhaskar K. (2017) Worldwide impact of warmer seasons on the incidence of renal colic and kidney stone disease: Evidence from a systematic review of literature. Journal of Endourology, 31 (8), 729-735. (doi:10.1089/end.2017.0123).

Record type: Article

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Several studies have examined the link between temperature or monthly seasonal variations and urolithiasis. The majority of these studies have demonstrated a link between higher ambient monthly temperatures and the incidence of renal colic and kidney stone disease (KSD). However, a worldwide trend on this association has not been explored and we perform a systematic review to examine the effect of seasonal variations on renal colic and KSD.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the literature for a 26-year period (1990-2017) was conducted on all studies reporting on the effect of seasonal variations and its link to KSD. Two reviewers independently extracted the data from each study, which were analyzed using SPSS version 24.

RESULTS: A total of 59 studies were identified, and after screening, 13 were included in this review. The studies ranged in duration from 1 to 9 years (mean: 5.5 years) and included seasonal/monthly variations for proven stones or lithotripsy treatments or emergency department presentations with renal colic. Except for one study, there was a statistically significant association between higher monthly mean temperatures and the incidence of KSD-related events reported from the United Kingdom, South Korea, the United States, Saudi Arabia, Italy, Spain, Taiwan, Japan, and New Zealand.

CONCLUSIONS: Worldwide trends on the incidence of renal colic and KSD seem be affected by seasonal variation favoring warmer months, with data suggesting that higher ambient temperature has an association with KSD.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 1 May 2017
Published date: August 2017
Keywords: Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419388
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419388
ISSN: 0892-7790
PURE UUID: 0f68a182-119f-4788-90c1-473263decb46

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Date deposited: 11 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:44

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Contributors

Author: Robert M. Geraghty
Author: Silvia Proietti
Author: Olivier Traxer
Author: Matthew Archer

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