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Effect of music on outpatient urological procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis from ESUT

Effect of music on outpatient urological procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis from ESUT
Effect of music on outpatient urological procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis from ESUT

PURPOSE: Music is a practical, inexpensive and harmless analgesic and anxiolytic. An increasing number of original studies have been performed to investigate its potential application in urology. Our aim was to identify the effect of music on outpatient based urological procedures.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We systematically reviewed the effect of using music during all reported outpatient urology procedures, including transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, shock wave lithotripsy, urodynamic studies, percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement and cystoscopy. Data were included on all randomized trials from 1980 to 2017 and no language restrictions were applied.

RESULTS: Included in analysis were 16 randomized studies in which 972 of 1,950 patients (49.8%) were exposed to music during an outpatient procedure. The procedures included transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in 4 studies in a total of 286 patients, shock wave lithotripsy in 6 studies in a total of 1023, cystoscopy in 3 studies in a total of 331, urodynamics in 2 studies in a total of 210 and percutaneous nephrostomy in 1 study in a total of 100. All studies incorporated a visual analog score to measure pain. Anxiety was measured by STAI (State-Trait anxiety Inventory) in 13 studies and by a visual analog scale in 2. While 14 of the 16 studies showed a reduction in self-reported pain, a reduction in anxiety was seen in 14. When using music, overall procedural satisfaction was better in 9 studies and patient willingness to repeat the procedure was also higher in 7. Our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in visual analog scale and STAI findings across all studies (p <0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review demonstrated a beneficial effect of music on urological outpatient procedures. Music seemed to decrease anxiety and pain. It might serve as a useful adjunct to increase procedural satisfaction and patient willingness to undergo the procedure again.

Journal Article
0022-5347
1-9
Kyriakides, Rena
fe2879db-c913-4282-8da2-d6c15f01959b
Jones, Patrick
d27beb5b-0e09-4ed5-89f0-6c62421c2397
Geraghty, Robert
ef19149e-530f-4749-9740-0902fed96fe1
Skolarikos, Andreas
7308ae8f-62d1-4ce6-9e66-d8c4c80294ad
Liatsikos, Evangellos
8b245ec0-0978-4b72-becd-7f1f8f6c868c
Traxer, Olivier
2fa78817-b6f8-4f00-b389-c9c9ddbd01f3
Pietropaolo, Amelia
dd6770c4-bf2e-46a9-b7a2-7bd3f9fdba56
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Kyriakides, Rena
fe2879db-c913-4282-8da2-d6c15f01959b
Jones, Patrick
d27beb5b-0e09-4ed5-89f0-6c62421c2397
Geraghty, Robert
ef19149e-530f-4749-9740-0902fed96fe1
Skolarikos, Andreas
7308ae8f-62d1-4ce6-9e66-d8c4c80294ad
Liatsikos, Evangellos
8b245ec0-0978-4b72-becd-7f1f8f6c868c
Traxer, Olivier
2fa78817-b6f8-4f00-b389-c9c9ddbd01f3
Pietropaolo, Amelia
dd6770c4-bf2e-46a9-b7a2-7bd3f9fdba56
Somani, Bhaskar K.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9

Kyriakides, Rena, Jones, Patrick, Geraghty, Robert, Skolarikos, Andreas, Liatsikos, Evangellos, Traxer, Olivier, Pietropaolo, Amelia and Somani, Bhaskar K. (2017) Effect of music on outpatient urological procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis from ESUT. The Journal of Urology, 1-9. (doi:10.1016/j.juro.2017.11.117).

Record type: Article

Abstract

PURPOSE: Music is a practical, inexpensive and harmless analgesic and anxiolytic. An increasing number of original studies have been performed to investigate its potential application in urology. Our aim was to identify the effect of music on outpatient based urological procedures.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We systematically reviewed the effect of using music during all reported outpatient urology procedures, including transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, shock wave lithotripsy, urodynamic studies, percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement and cystoscopy. Data were included on all randomized trials from 1980 to 2017 and no language restrictions were applied.

RESULTS: Included in analysis were 16 randomized studies in which 972 of 1,950 patients (49.8%) were exposed to music during an outpatient procedure. The procedures included transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in 4 studies in a total of 286 patients, shock wave lithotripsy in 6 studies in a total of 1023, cystoscopy in 3 studies in a total of 331, urodynamics in 2 studies in a total of 210 and percutaneous nephrostomy in 1 study in a total of 100. All studies incorporated a visual analog score to measure pain. Anxiety was measured by STAI (State-Trait anxiety Inventory) in 13 studies and by a visual analog scale in 2. While 14 of the 16 studies showed a reduction in self-reported pain, a reduction in anxiety was seen in 14. When using music, overall procedural satisfaction was better in 9 studies and patient willingness to repeat the procedure was also higher in 7. Our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in visual analog scale and STAI findings across all studies (p <0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Our systematic review demonstrated a beneficial effect of music on urological outpatient procedures. Music seemed to decrease anxiety and pain. It might serve as a useful adjunct to increase procedural satisfaction and patient willingness to undergo the procedure again.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 December 2017
Keywords: Journal Article

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419390
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419390
ISSN: 0022-5347
PURE UUID: c3999845-d365-49a9-bc1f-b091a9590708

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Date deposited: 11 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 06 Oct 2020 19:03

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