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Survey and summary. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides: a third strand for DNA nanotechnology

Survey and summary. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides: a third strand for DNA nanotechnology
Survey and summary. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides: a third strand for DNA nanotechnology

DNA self-assembly has proved to be a useful bottomup strategy for the construction of user-defined nanoscale objects, lattices and devices. The design of these structures has largely relied on exploiting simple base pairing rules and the formation of double-helical domains as secondary structural elements. However, other helical forms involving specific non-canonical base-base interactions have introduced a novel paradigm into the process of engineering with DNA. The most notable of these is a three-stranded complex generated by the binding of a third strand within the duplex major groove, generating a triple-helical ('triplex') structure. The sequence, structural and assembly requirements that differentiate triplexes from their duplex counterparts has allowed the design of nanostructures for both dynamic and/or structural purposes, as well as a means to target non-nucleic acid components to precise locations within a nanostructure scaffold. Here, we review the properties of triplexes that have proved useful in the engineering of DNA nanostructures, with an emphasis on applications that hitherto have not been possible by duplex formation alone.

0305-1048
1021-1037
Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard
96e2438e-04e3-442e-9a62-8f6199535faf
Rusling, David A.
d08f1f97-f8a9-4980-a025-ae41c23a938f
Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard
96e2438e-04e3-442e-9a62-8f6199535faf
Rusling, David A.
d08f1f97-f8a9-4980-a025-ae41c23a938f

Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard and Rusling, David A. (2018) Survey and summary. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides: a third strand for DNA nanotechnology. Nucleic Acids Research, 46 (3), 1021-1037, [gkx1230]. (doi:10.1093/nar/gkx1230).

Record type: Review

Abstract

DNA self-assembly has proved to be a useful bottomup strategy for the construction of user-defined nanoscale objects, lattices and devices. The design of these structures has largely relied on exploiting simple base pairing rules and the formation of double-helical domains as secondary structural elements. However, other helical forms involving specific non-canonical base-base interactions have introduced a novel paradigm into the process of engineering with DNA. The most notable of these is a three-stranded complex generated by the binding of a third strand within the duplex major groove, generating a triple-helical ('triplex') structure. The sequence, structural and assembly requirements that differentiate triplexes from their duplex counterparts has allowed the design of nanostructures for both dynamic and/or structural purposes, as well as a means to target non-nucleic acid components to precise locations within a nanostructure scaffold. Here, we review the properties of triplexes that have proved useful in the engineering of DNA nanostructures, with an emphasis on applications that hitherto have not been possible by duplex formation alone.

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Accepted/In Press date: 30 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 December 2017
Published date: 16 February 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419509
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419509
ISSN: 0305-1048
PURE UUID: e0075d6a-4dcf-4a01-b6a1-94e4b29e0b74
ORCID for David A. Rusling: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7442-686X

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Date deposited: 13 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:50

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Author: Arun Richard Chandrasekaran

University divisions

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