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The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in patients with cystic fibrosis: An under-recognized problem

The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in patients with cystic fibrosis: An under-recognized problem
The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in patients with cystic fibrosis: An under-recognized problem

Objective: To identify the prevalence of stress urinary and fecal incontinence in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and investigate any correlation between CF severity and the incidence and degree of incontinence. Patients and methods: An initial postal questionnaire was used to identify patients with an incontinence problem, followed by a detailed interview-administered questionnaire assessing the type of incontinence and the impact of the incontinence on patients and the management of their CF. The correlation between CF severity and the incidence and severity of incontinence was also analysed. All patients aged 5-18 years attending the CF service at The Respiratory and Urology departments of a University Teaching Hospital were invited to participate. There was no therapeutic intervention. Results: Stress urinary incontinence was present in 31% of girls and 2.2% of boys, with fecal incontinence in four girls. The youngest patient with incontinence was 9 years old. Of the patients, 78% found their incontinence a problem and 44% had hidden the problem from parents and carers. There was no correlation between incontinence and the severity of CF as measured by the forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is common in girls with CF and in many cases it is a hidden problem. These patients need to be identified so they can receive appropriate management, instead of suffering in silence.

Cystic fibrosis, Fecal incontinence, Urinary incontinence
1477-5131
5-9
Blackwell, K.
32cadc94-7203-4ff0-97e2-b46f3976ac14
Malone, Pat S.J.
d3025d40-2dfb-43f7-a314-601019749e2f
Denny, A.
db52f72e-7175-47d9-ba96-e4edf787113c
Connett, G.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Maddison, J.
a8a56af6-37f7-49cf-bb88-4f0eed00e76d
Blackwell, K.
32cadc94-7203-4ff0-97e2-b46f3976ac14
Malone, Pat S.J.
d3025d40-2dfb-43f7-a314-601019749e2f
Denny, A.
db52f72e-7175-47d9-ba96-e4edf787113c
Connett, G.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Maddison, J.
a8a56af6-37f7-49cf-bb88-4f0eed00e76d

Blackwell, K., Malone, Pat S.J., Denny, A., Connett, G. and Maddison, J. (2005) The prevalence of stress urinary incontinence in patients with cystic fibrosis: An under-recognized problem. Journal of Pediatric Urology, 1 (1), 5-9. (doi:10.1016/j.jpurol.2004.07.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To identify the prevalence of stress urinary and fecal incontinence in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and investigate any correlation between CF severity and the incidence and degree of incontinence. Patients and methods: An initial postal questionnaire was used to identify patients with an incontinence problem, followed by a detailed interview-administered questionnaire assessing the type of incontinence and the impact of the incontinence on patients and the management of their CF. The correlation between CF severity and the incidence and severity of incontinence was also analysed. All patients aged 5-18 years attending the CF service at The Respiratory and Urology departments of a University Teaching Hospital were invited to participate. There was no therapeutic intervention. Results: Stress urinary incontinence was present in 31% of girls and 2.2% of boys, with fecal incontinence in four girls. The youngest patient with incontinence was 9 years old. Of the patients, 78% found their incontinence a problem and 44% had hidden the problem from parents and carers. There was no correlation between incontinence and the severity of CF as measured by the forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Conclusions: Urinary incontinence is common in girls with CF and in many cases it is a hidden problem. These patients need to be identified so they can receive appropriate management, instead of suffering in silence.

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More information

Published date: February 2005
Keywords: Cystic fibrosis, Fecal incontinence, Urinary incontinence

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419568
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419568
ISSN: 1477-5131
PURE UUID: ecebcfbf-fe6d-46b7-b1c3-5a2b16d7a39d
ORCID for G. Connett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1310-3239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:23

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Contributors

Author: K. Blackwell
Author: Pat S.J. Malone
Author: A. Denny
Author: G. Connett ORCID iD
Author: J. Maddison

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