The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis

Juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis
Juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis

Always ask about hoarseness and quality of voice in a history of any child presenting with cough or asthma-like symptoms. Children presenting with what appears to be an acute onset of hoarseness, without any physical signs of airways obstruction, should be reviewed after two weeks. If there is chronic hoarseness, referral to an ENT specialist should be considered with a view to laryngoscopy. If the child develops clinical signs of acute airway obstruction such as stridor or respiratory distress, prompt paediatric review is indicated. When referring, it is important to emphasise whether or not there is chronic hoarseness in order to differentiate the diagnosis from croup. Juvenile Laryngeal Papillomatosis may present with cough, pneumonia, dysphagia, or stridor, as well as hoarseness. These patients are often misdiagnosed as having asthma or allergies.

1471-4418
125-127
Coope, Gerald
f0dc8869-e109-4902-8f1c-b97b85132fde
Connett, Gary
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Coope, Gerald
f0dc8869-e109-4902-8f1c-b97b85132fde
Connett, Gary
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516

Coope, Gerald and Connett, Gary (2006) Juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis. Primary Care Respiratory Journal, 15 (2), 125-127. (doi:10.1016/j.pcrj.2006.02.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Always ask about hoarseness and quality of voice in a history of any child presenting with cough or asthma-like symptoms. Children presenting with what appears to be an acute onset of hoarseness, without any physical signs of airways obstruction, should be reviewed after two weeks. If there is chronic hoarseness, referral to an ENT specialist should be considered with a view to laryngoscopy. If the child develops clinical signs of acute airway obstruction such as stridor or respiratory distress, prompt paediatric review is indicated. When referring, it is important to emphasise whether or not there is chronic hoarseness in order to differentiate the diagnosis from croup. Juvenile Laryngeal Papillomatosis may present with cough, pneumonia, dysphagia, or stridor, as well as hoarseness. These patients are often misdiagnosed as having asthma or allergies.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 February 2006
Published date: April 2006

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419572
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419572
ISSN: 1471-4418
PURE UUID: 7320583c-0783-4110-8202-5a0263f4cb06
ORCID for Gary Connett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1310-3239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:24

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Gerald Coope
Author: Gary Connett ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×