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Nutritional outcomes in cystic fibrosis - are we doing enough?

Nutritional outcomes in cystic fibrosis - are we doing enough?
Nutritional outcomes in cystic fibrosis - are we doing enough?

Although outcome data for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have shown consistent improvements throughout the twentieth century, more recent national registry data suggests that outcomes have reached a plateau. Median values for nutritional outcomes in CF currently cluster around the fiftieth centile for the normal population. These data suggest that up to half of CF patients have sub-optimal body mass index (BMI) which might have a significant adverse impact on their respiratory status. BMI might be underestimating the extent to which more important lean body mass might also be reduced. Nutritional decline is a particular problem during adolescence and commonly persists into early adult life. Current treatment strategies to optimize nutrition include the use of high energy diets, proton pump inhibitors and optimal use of enzyme preparations including higher strength preparations to decrease pill burden. Whilst these are all of potential benefit, poor adherence to nutritional care recommendations is probably the greatest impediment to future health improvement. More effective strategies to impact on treatment adherence are needed.

Adherence, Body Mass Index, Cystic Fibrosis, Lean Body Mass, Nutrition
1526-0542
31-34
Connett, Gary J.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Pike, Katharine C.
99a84385-a195-43f1-bd68-2af0af420c95
Connett, Gary J.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Pike, Katharine C.
99a84385-a195-43f1-bd68-2af0af420c95

Connett, Gary J. and Pike, Katharine C. (2015) Nutritional outcomes in cystic fibrosis - are we doing enough? Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, 16 (Supplement 1), 31-34, [1062]. (doi:10.1016/j.prrv.2015.07.015).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Although outcome data for individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have shown consistent improvements throughout the twentieth century, more recent national registry data suggests that outcomes have reached a plateau. Median values for nutritional outcomes in CF currently cluster around the fiftieth centile for the normal population. These data suggest that up to half of CF patients have sub-optimal body mass index (BMI) which might have a significant adverse impact on their respiratory status. BMI might be underestimating the extent to which more important lean body mass might also be reduced. Nutritional decline is a particular problem during adolescence and commonly persists into early adult life. Current treatment strategies to optimize nutrition include the use of high energy diets, proton pump inhibitors and optimal use of enzyme preparations including higher strength preparations to decrease pill burden. Whilst these are all of potential benefit, poor adherence to nutritional care recommendations is probably the greatest impediment to future health improvement. More effective strategies to impact on treatment adherence are needed.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 22 September 2015
Published date: 1 October 2015
Keywords: Adherence, Body Mass Index, Cystic Fibrosis, Lean Body Mass, Nutrition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419580
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419580
ISSN: 1526-0542
PURE UUID: 17d40e88-b817-44f6-99d0-1bed2052c341
ORCID for Gary J. Connett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1310-3239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 26 Mar 2021 02:58

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