The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Preparation of iron-enriched baker's yeast and its efficiency in recovery of rats from dietary iron deficiency

Preparation of iron-enriched baker's yeast and its efficiency in recovery of rats from dietary iron deficiency
Preparation of iron-enriched baker's yeast and its efficiency in recovery of rats from dietary iron deficiency

OBJECTIVES: Iron is an important mineral, essential for the health and function of mammalian cells. Despite its key role, iron deficiency in humans is common worldwide, often leading to significant health issues within the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of using iron-enriched baker's yeast as a source of iron, especially for the protection and recovery from conditions related to anemia.

METHODS: Iron-enriched yeast was prepared by cultivating cells on basal medium comprising different iron concentrations. The effects of iron supplementation on animal health were assessed by feeding anemic rats with a variety of diets containing either inorganic iron or iron-enriched yeast. Body weight, iron bioavailability, blood parameters, and the activity of iron-containing enzymes (catalase) were studied.

RESULTS: Iron accumulation in yeast cells increased with iron concentration, reaching a maximum of 15 mg/g when 32 mM iron was applied. Rat groups fed iron-enriched yeast had the highest feed efficiency, iron bioavailability, and hemoglobin concentration. The source of iron supplementation influenced catalase activity in kidney tissues, increasing from 70 U/g tissue in anemic rats to 90 U/g tissue (inorganic iron salt), 110 U/g tissue (inorganic iron salt and non-enriched dry yeast), 145 U/g tissue (iron-enriched yeast 15 mg/g iron) and 115 U/g tissue (iron-enriched yeast 30 mg/g iron). The histologic study of tissues from liver, kidney, heart, and spleen of rats from different groups showed that the damage observed in tissues of anemic rats, was not observed after feeding with iron-enriched yeasts.

CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated that ingestion of iron-enriched yeast is more efficient than inorganic treatment in recovery from iron deficiency, including tissue recovery in rats.

Anemia, Iron-Deficiency, Animals, Biological Availability, Body Weight, Catalase, Dietary Supplements, Female, Heart, Hemoglobins, Intestinal Absorption, Iron, Iron, Dietary, Kidney, Liver, Male, Myocardium, Rats, Wistar, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spleen, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
0899-9007
1155-1164
Kyyaly, Mohammad Aref
7bd69b33-fec8-405c-9f40-b7157f0242f0
Powell, Chris
e692742a-02f9-4d50-873d-3c733fbd1347
Ramadan, Elshahat
27750251-148b-4d2f-a9d2-42426d036edb
Kyyaly, Mohammad Aref
7bd69b33-fec8-405c-9f40-b7157f0242f0
Powell, Chris
e692742a-02f9-4d50-873d-3c733fbd1347
Ramadan, Elshahat
27750251-148b-4d2f-a9d2-42426d036edb

Kyyaly, Mohammad Aref, Powell, Chris and Ramadan, Elshahat (2015) Preparation of iron-enriched baker's yeast and its efficiency in recovery of rats from dietary iron deficiency. Nutrition, 31 (9), 1155-1164. (doi:10.1016/j.nut.2015.04.017).

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Iron is an important mineral, essential for the health and function of mammalian cells. Despite its key role, iron deficiency in humans is common worldwide, often leading to significant health issues within the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of using iron-enriched baker's yeast as a source of iron, especially for the protection and recovery from conditions related to anemia.

METHODS: Iron-enriched yeast was prepared by cultivating cells on basal medium comprising different iron concentrations. The effects of iron supplementation on animal health were assessed by feeding anemic rats with a variety of diets containing either inorganic iron or iron-enriched yeast. Body weight, iron bioavailability, blood parameters, and the activity of iron-containing enzymes (catalase) were studied.

RESULTS: Iron accumulation in yeast cells increased with iron concentration, reaching a maximum of 15 mg/g when 32 mM iron was applied. Rat groups fed iron-enriched yeast had the highest feed efficiency, iron bioavailability, and hemoglobin concentration. The source of iron supplementation influenced catalase activity in kidney tissues, increasing from 70 U/g tissue in anemic rats to 90 U/g tissue (inorganic iron salt), 110 U/g tissue (inorganic iron salt and non-enriched dry yeast), 145 U/g tissue (iron-enriched yeast 15 mg/g iron) and 115 U/g tissue (iron-enriched yeast 30 mg/g iron). The histologic study of tissues from liver, kidney, heart, and spleen of rats from different groups showed that the damage observed in tissues of anemic rats, was not observed after feeding with iron-enriched yeasts.

CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated that ingestion of iron-enriched yeast is more efficient than inorganic treatment in recovery from iron deficiency, including tissue recovery in rats.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 April 2015
Published date: September 2015
Additional Information: Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Anemia, Iron-Deficiency, Animals, Biological Availability, Body Weight, Catalase, Dietary Supplements, Female, Heart, Hemoglobins, Intestinal Absorption, Iron, Iron, Dietary, Kidney, Liver, Male, Myocardium, Rats, Wistar, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Spleen, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419592
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419592
ISSN: 0899-9007
PURE UUID: fe8e017b-1768-43d4-b484-f3bd0649dbde
ORCID for Mohammad Aref Kyyaly: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1684-9207

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Apr 2018 16:31
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:31

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Mohammad Aref Kyyaly ORCID iD
Author: Chris Powell
Author: Elshahat Ramadan

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×