The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Revising the UIC 406 method: Revenue generating capacity

Revising the UIC 406 method: Revenue generating capacity
Revising the UIC 406 method: Revenue generating capacity

The UIC 406 method has been published by the International Union of Railways (UIC) in 2004 and quantifies capacity utilisation for a given infrastructure. It is generally suitable for capacity analysis in European railways that are focused mainly on passenger operations and run according to exact timetables. This method defines railway capacity as "the total number of possible paths in a defined time window, considering the actual path mix or known developments respectively". To measure the railway capacity consumption, timetable graphs can be used whereby the given infrastructure and the type of rolling stock are implicitly included as they determine the size of the blocking stairs1. The capacity consumption is measured by compressing the timetable graphs so that the buffer times are equal to zero. This paper adopts a system approach toward railways and describes the interactions between its different subsystems. Infrastructure management is discussed in the context of performance evaluation. The significance of timetable is stressed as what links all railway subsystems together, determining performance of the whole railway system. Timetable characteristics that affect railway capacity are discussed followed by current theoretical methods to evaluate railway capacity by compressing the timetable. Some of the weaknesses of the UIC 406 method are identified and discussed. To tackle them, the authors define a new term as "Revenue generating capacity" that analyses capacity utilisation according to an estimation of revenue, taking into account wider socio-economic benefits. A weighted UIC method that considers a proper weight for different types of trains that takes into account the revenue generated based on the train type, load factor as well as probability and costs of delays is suggested for further research.

579-588
American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Khadem-Sameni, Melody
23a8d943-858f-4cb1-bbfa-aa7aa3412715
Landex, Alex
9a640fe9-fad1-4c1e-9ae1-7036c2df8b17
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b
Khadem-Sameni, Melody
23a8d943-858f-4cb1-bbfa-aa7aa3412715
Landex, Alex
9a640fe9-fad1-4c1e-9ae1-7036c2df8b17
Preston, John
ef81c42e-c896-4768-92d1-052662037f0b

Khadem-Sameni, Melody, Landex, Alex and Preston, John (2010) Revising the UIC 406 method: Revenue generating capacity. In Proceedings of the ASME Joint Rail Conference 2010, JRC2010. vol. 2, American Society Of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). pp. 579-588 . (doi:10.1115/JRC2010-36281).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The UIC 406 method has been published by the International Union of Railways (UIC) in 2004 and quantifies capacity utilisation for a given infrastructure. It is generally suitable for capacity analysis in European railways that are focused mainly on passenger operations and run according to exact timetables. This method defines railway capacity as "the total number of possible paths in a defined time window, considering the actual path mix or known developments respectively". To measure the railway capacity consumption, timetable graphs can be used whereby the given infrastructure and the type of rolling stock are implicitly included as they determine the size of the blocking stairs1. The capacity consumption is measured by compressing the timetable graphs so that the buffer times are equal to zero. This paper adopts a system approach toward railways and describes the interactions between its different subsystems. Infrastructure management is discussed in the context of performance evaluation. The significance of timetable is stressed as what links all railway subsystems together, determining performance of the whole railway system. Timetable characteristics that affect railway capacity are discussed followed by current theoretical methods to evaluate railway capacity by compressing the timetable. Some of the weaknesses of the UIC 406 method are identified and discussed. To tackle them, the authors define a new term as "Revenue generating capacity" that analyses capacity utilisation according to an estimation of revenue, taking into account wider socio-economic benefits. A weighted UIC method that considers a proper weight for different types of trains that takes into account the revenue generated based on the train type, load factor as well as probability and costs of delays is suggested for further research.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2010
Venue - Dates: ASME 2010 Joint Rail Conference, JRC2010, United States, 2010-04-26 - 2010-04-28

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419840
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419840
PURE UUID: 3aa1f446-86b2-439d-9984-5c01cf1eee29
ORCID for John Preston: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6866-049X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:52

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×