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Uplift mechanisms of pipes buried in sand

Uplift mechanisms of pipes buried in sand
Uplift mechanisms of pipes buried in sand

Reliable design against upheaval buckling of offshore pipelines requires the uplift response to be predicted. This paper describes a model-scale investigation into the mechanisms by which uplift resistance is mobilized in silica sand, and illustrates how the observed mechanisms are captured in prediction models. A novel image-based deformation measurement technique has been used. The results show that peak uplift resistance is mobilized through the formation of an inverted trapezoidal block, bounded by a pair of distributed shear zones. The inclination of the shear zone is dependent on the soil density, and therefore dilatancy. After peak resistance, shear bands form and softening behavior is observed. At large pipe displacements, either a combination of a vertical sliding block mechanism and a flow-around mechanism near the pipe or a localized flow-around mechanism without surface heave is observed, depending on the soil density and particle size.

Buried pipes, Imaging techniques, Particle size, Sand, Soil deformation, Uplift resistance
1090-0241
154-163
Cheuk, C.Y.
4fd1f770-b1c1-4d15-b1b2-464c7a2a0d86
White, D.J.
a986033d-d26d-4419-a3f3-20dc54efce93
Bolton, M.D.
9fbf6ba8-1095-4220-a7f6-38f5463a58e7
Cheuk, C.Y.
4fd1f770-b1c1-4d15-b1b2-464c7a2a0d86
White, D.J.
a986033d-d26d-4419-a3f3-20dc54efce93
Bolton, M.D.
9fbf6ba8-1095-4220-a7f6-38f5463a58e7

Cheuk, C.Y., White, D.J. and Bolton, M.D. (2008) Uplift mechanisms of pipes buried in sand. Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, 134 (2), 154-163. (doi:10.1061/(ASCE)1090-0241(2008)134:2(154)).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Reliable design against upheaval buckling of offshore pipelines requires the uplift response to be predicted. This paper describes a model-scale investigation into the mechanisms by which uplift resistance is mobilized in silica sand, and illustrates how the observed mechanisms are captured in prediction models. A novel image-based deformation measurement technique has been used. The results show that peak uplift resistance is mobilized through the formation of an inverted trapezoidal block, bounded by a pair of distributed shear zones. The inclination of the shear zone is dependent on the soil density, and therefore dilatancy. After peak resistance, shear bands form and softening behavior is observed. At large pipe displacements, either a combination of a vertical sliding block mechanism and a flow-around mechanism near the pipe or a localized flow-around mechanism without surface heave is observed, depending on the soil density and particle size.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 April 2007
e-pub ahead of print date: 1 February 2008
Published date: February 2008
Keywords: Buried pipes, Imaging techniques, Particle size, Sand, Soil deformation, Uplift resistance

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419862
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419862
ISSN: 1090-0241
PURE UUID: cdd06129-ed80-46ed-8271-d9e8b039b3dc
ORCID for D.J. White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2968-582X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 12 Nov 2019 01:26

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