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Geotechnics for subsea pipelines

Geotechnics for subsea pipelines
Geotechnics for subsea pipelines

The geotechnical analysis performed for subsea pipeline design involves challenges that are not common in conventional foundation engineering. This paper reviews recent research in pipeline geotechnics and shows examples of how this research is being applied in practice.A general theme running through this paper is the twin challenges of the changes in seabed topography and the changes in soil properties that occur through the installation and operating life of a pipeline. Results from in situ and element testing of soils that replicate the loading and disturbance imposed by pipelines are used to show that significant changes in strength are induced. Soil generally weakens during the episodes of remoulding that accompany pipeline laying, buckling, walking and storm loading, and during ploughing and trenching. The soil strength recovers during subsequent episodes of reconsolidation between storms, and between startup and shutdown events. Solutions for incorporating this behaviour into the estimation of axial and lateral pipe-soil resistance, and the assessment of trenching and ploughing operations, are discussed. A unifying theme is the relative magnitude of drained and undrained soil strengths, the evolution of these strengths through cyclic episodes, and the importance of recognising the widelyvarying rates of shearing involved in pipe-soil processes. Pipeline geotechnics can involve drained behaviour in fine-grained clayey soils - for example, during slow axial expansion of pipelines - and undrained behaviour in coarse-grained soils - for example during ploughing. Concepts from critical state soil mechanics often provide a simple framework for clarifying this behaviour.

87-123
CRC Press
White, D.J.
a986033d-d26d-4419-a3f3-20dc54efce93
Cathie, D.N.
1024d51b-1dc1-442b-b7d6-ce3d944f8784
Gourvenec, Susan
White, David
White, D.J.
a986033d-d26d-4419-a3f3-20dc54efce93
Cathie, D.N.
1024d51b-1dc1-442b-b7d6-ce3d944f8784
Gourvenec, Susan
White, David

White, D.J. and Cathie, D.N. (2010) Geotechnics for subsea pipelines. Gourvenec, Susan and White, David (eds.) In Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics II: Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics. CRC Press. pp. 87-123 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The geotechnical analysis performed for subsea pipeline design involves challenges that are not common in conventional foundation engineering. This paper reviews recent research in pipeline geotechnics and shows examples of how this research is being applied in practice.A general theme running through this paper is the twin challenges of the changes in seabed topography and the changes in soil properties that occur through the installation and operating life of a pipeline. Results from in situ and element testing of soils that replicate the loading and disturbance imposed by pipelines are used to show that significant changes in strength are induced. Soil generally weakens during the episodes of remoulding that accompany pipeline laying, buckling, walking and storm loading, and during ploughing and trenching. The soil strength recovers during subsequent episodes of reconsolidation between storms, and between startup and shutdown events. Solutions for incorporating this behaviour into the estimation of axial and lateral pipe-soil resistance, and the assessment of trenching and ploughing operations, are discussed. A unifying theme is the relative magnitude of drained and undrained soil strengths, the evolution of these strengths through cyclic episodes, and the importance of recognising the widelyvarying rates of shearing involved in pipe-soil processes. Pipeline geotechnics can involve drained behaviour in fine-grained clayey soils - for example, during slow axial expansion of pipelines - and undrained behaviour in coarse-grained soils - for example during ploughing. Concepts from critical state soil mechanics often provide a simple framework for clarifying this behaviour.

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More information

Published date: 2010
Venue - Dates: 2nd International Symposium on Frontiers in Offshore Geotechnics, Perth, Australia, 2010-11-08 - 2010-11-10

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419898
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419898
PURE UUID: 6650c7d1-716f-47a9-b410-6705f1b83cd4
ORCID for D.J. White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2968-582X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:26

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Contributors

Author: D.J. White ORCID iD
Author: D.N. Cathie
Editor: Susan Gourvenec
Editor: David White

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