The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Modelling the axial soil resistance on deep-water pipelines

Modelling the axial soil resistance on deep-water pipelines
Modelling the axial soil resistance on deep-water pipelines

Axial pipe-soil resistance is an important aspect of deepwater pipeline design, since it influences the longitudinal and lateral buckling responses under thermally induced expansion and contraction of the pipeline. Experimental evidence has shown that the axial resistance, expressed as a proportion of the submerged pipeline weight, can vary by an order of magnitude, depending on the rate of axial movement and cumulative time. This paper provides a theoretical framework for assessing the magnitude of axial friction. The framework is developed within a critical-state context using effective stresses, applicable to any degree of drainage in the soil, quantifying the magnitude and duration of excess pore pressures generated near the pipe/soil interface. Two other aspects of behaviour are added to match the observed velocity dependence of axial resistance: (a) a damage term, leading to contractive volumetric strain at the interface; and (b) strain-rate dependence of the mobilised soil strength. Analytical expressions are derived that capture the above features of the response. The resulting variations of normalised frictional resistance with time and velocity are then shown to match experimental data from interface shear-box tests, representing a planar idealisation of the same behaviour, and from model pipe tests.

Friction, Offshore engineering, Pipelines, Theoretical analysis
0016-8505
837-846
Randolph, M.F.
75caa33a-e630-4ae8-84cd-758797bf9633
White, D.J.
a986033d-d26d-4419-a3f3-20dc54efce93
Yan, Y.
3864bfec-4680-4297-95a8-7fedf0f5498d
Randolph, M.F.
75caa33a-e630-4ae8-84cd-758797bf9633
White, D.J.
a986033d-d26d-4419-a3f3-20dc54efce93
Yan, Y.
3864bfec-4680-4297-95a8-7fedf0f5498d

Randolph, M.F., White, D.J. and Yan, Y. (2012) Modelling the axial soil resistance on deep-water pipelines. Géotechnique, 62 (9), 837-846. (doi:10.1680/geot.12.OG.010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Axial pipe-soil resistance is an important aspect of deepwater pipeline design, since it influences the longitudinal and lateral buckling responses under thermally induced expansion and contraction of the pipeline. Experimental evidence has shown that the axial resistance, expressed as a proportion of the submerged pipeline weight, can vary by an order of magnitude, depending on the rate of axial movement and cumulative time. This paper provides a theoretical framework for assessing the magnitude of axial friction. The framework is developed within a critical-state context using effective stresses, applicable to any degree of drainage in the soil, quantifying the magnitude and duration of excess pore pressures generated near the pipe/soil interface. Two other aspects of behaviour are added to match the observed velocity dependence of axial resistance: (a) a damage term, leading to contractive volumetric strain at the interface; and (b) strain-rate dependence of the mobilised soil strength. Analytical expressions are derived that capture the above features of the response. The resulting variations of normalised frictional resistance with time and velocity are then shown to match experimental data from interface shear-box tests, representing a planar idealisation of the same behaviour, and from model pipe tests.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2012
Keywords: Friction, Offshore engineering, Pipelines, Theoretical analysis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419906
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419906
ISSN: 0016-8505
PURE UUID: 4ccdf372-4374-424a-9e7f-b8df4857e6bc
ORCID for D.J. White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2968-582X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 01 Oct 2019 00:25

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: M.F. Randolph
Author: D.J. White ORCID iD
Author: Y. Yan

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×