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Nostalgia shapes and potentiates the future

Nostalgia shapes and potentiates the future
Nostalgia shapes and potentiates the future

Nostalgia is “a sentimental longing or wistful affection for the past” (Pearsall, 1998, p. 1266). This dictionary definition aligns well with lay conceptions (i.e., prototype analysis; cf. Rosch, 1978). Laypeople (Hepper, Ritchie, Sedikides, & Wildschut, 2012) across 18 cultures (Hepper et al., 2014) think of the construct “nostalgia” as encompassing fond, rose-colored, and personally important (i.e., self-defining) memories of one’s childhood or relationships, but also as encompassing pining and wishing for momentary returns to the past. They think of it, then, as a bittersweet (albeit more positive than negative) emotion that is relevant to the self and close others. Both content analyses of nostalgic narratives (Abeyta, Routledge, Roylance, Wildschut, & Sedikides, 2015; Holak & Havlena, 1998; Wildschut, Sedikides, Arndt, & Routledge, 2006, Studies 1-2) and in vivo manipulations of nostalgia (Baldwin, Biernat, & Landau, 2015; Wildschut et al., 2006, Studies 5-7; Stephan, Sedikides, & Wildschut, 2012) have corroborated these properties of the emotion.

181-199
Routledge
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Wildschut, Tim
4452a61d-1649-4c4a-bb1d-154ec446ff81
Stephan, Elena
4d379020-be54-4a1c-848a-9b61923648d2
Forgas, Joseph P.
Bausmeister, Roy F.
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Wildschut, Tim
4452a61d-1649-4c4a-bb1d-154ec446ff81
Stephan, Elena
4d379020-be54-4a1c-848a-9b61923648d2
Forgas, Joseph P.
Bausmeister, Roy F.

Sedikides, Constantine, Wildschut, Tim and Stephan, Elena (2018) Nostalgia shapes and potentiates the future. In, Forgas, Joseph P. and Bausmeister, Roy F. (eds.) The Social Psychology of Living Well. Routledge, pp. 181-199. (doi:10.4324/9781351189712).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Nostalgia is “a sentimental longing or wistful affection for the past” (Pearsall, 1998, p. 1266). This dictionary definition aligns well with lay conceptions (i.e., prototype analysis; cf. Rosch, 1978). Laypeople (Hepper, Ritchie, Sedikides, & Wildschut, 2012) across 18 cultures (Hepper et al., 2014) think of the construct “nostalgia” as encompassing fond, rose-colored, and personally important (i.e., self-defining) memories of one’s childhood or relationships, but also as encompassing pining and wishing for momentary returns to the past. They think of it, then, as a bittersweet (albeit more positive than negative) emotion that is relevant to the self and close others. Both content analyses of nostalgic narratives (Abeyta, Routledge, Roylance, Wildschut, & Sedikides, 2015; Holak & Havlena, 1998; Wildschut, Sedikides, Arndt, & Routledge, 2006, Studies 1-2) and in vivo manipulations of nostalgia (Baldwin, Biernat, & Landau, 2015; Wildschut et al., 2006, Studies 5-7; Stephan, Sedikides, & Wildschut, 2012) have corroborated these properties of the emotion.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 29 January 2018
Published date: 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420238
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420238
PURE UUID: 48158929-70f2-4f8f-89dc-0b87a9a37b92

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Date deposited: 03 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:31

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Contributors

Author: Tim Wildschut
Author: Elena Stephan
Editor: Joseph P. Forgas
Editor: Roy F. Bausmeister

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