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Gene-by-activity interactions on obesity traits of 6-year-old New Zealand European children: A children of SCOPE study

Gene-by-activity interactions on obesity traits of 6-year-old New Zealand European children: A children of SCOPE study
Gene-by-activity interactions on obesity traits of 6-year-old New Zealand European children: A children of SCOPE study

Purpose: The decline of physical activity in children is considered an important determinant to explain the rising rates of obesity. However, this risk may be augmented in children who are genetically susceptible to increased weight gain. We hypothesized that a sedentary lifestyle and moderate activity will interact with genetic loci, resulting in differential effects in relation to obesity risk. Methods: We recruited 643 European children born to participants in the New Zealand-based Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study. Seventy gene variants were evaluated by the Sequenom assay. Interaction analyses were performed between the genetic variants and the activity type derived from actigraphy, in relation to percentage body fat. Results: We found a statistically significant association between increased proportions of sedentary activitywith increased percentage body fat scores (P = .012). The OLFM4-9568856 (P = .01) and GNPDA2-rs10938397 (P = .044) gene variants showed genotype differences with proportions of sedentary activity. Similarly, the OLFM4-9568856 (P = .021), CLOCK-rs4864548 (P = .029), and LEPR-1045895 (P = .047) showed genotype differences with proportions of moderate activity. We found evidence for unadjusted gene-by-activity interactions of SPACA3/SPRASArs16967845, PFKP-rs6602024, and SH2B1-rs7498665 on percentage body fat scores. Conclusions: These findings indicate a differential effect of physical activity in relation to obesity risk, suggesting that children genetically predisposed to increased weight gain may benefit from higher levels of moderate activity.

BMI z scores, Childhood obesity, Genetics, Moderate activity, Percentage body fat, Sedentary behavior
0899-8493
71-82
Krishnan, Mohanraj
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Shelling, Andrew N.
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Wall, Clare R.
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Mitchell, Edwin A.
00ddf519-bf0c-49a4-b257-a23179bc1e73
Murphy, Rinki
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McCowan, Lesley M.E.
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Thompson, John M.D.
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Cutfield, W.
d354249b-f23a-4afc-a7a8-e28aca00d9fd
Huang, Y.
f33cc94e-878d-4866-81bb-a74fb9aa43bf
Stewart, A.
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Taylor, R.
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Godfrey, K. M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Poston, L.
7503d11e-bc6a-4925-b622-bf2937ab1722
Taylor, P.
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Children of SCOPE Study Group
Krishnan, Mohanraj
7e4c1a73-3d6a-483b-8552-9e329a9d1365
Shelling, Andrew N.
a5ab6d31-e1e1-41a5-ac82-c7a8c2956ed2
Wall, Clare R.
e2d9fa85-ce60-4aaf-bcba-4c3d4600b5dc
Mitchell, Edwin A.
00ddf519-bf0c-49a4-b257-a23179bc1e73
Murphy, Rinki
9b647919-6b97-48d3-b24d-d09c9be1afc1
McCowan, Lesley M.E.
02f6c766-b434-4396-858e-a84eaf34b62c
Thompson, John M.D.
09e63c7e-810a-4b9f-8732-2b412adda3be
Cutfield, W.
d354249b-f23a-4afc-a7a8-e28aca00d9fd
Huang, Y.
f33cc94e-878d-4866-81bb-a74fb9aa43bf
Stewart, A.
16e5e149-14ad-4a64-87a8-5bf128c1411b
Taylor, R.
f7649f2a-578b-4e41-9a92-d2d48560286b
Godfrey, K. M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Poston, L.
7503d11e-bc6a-4925-b622-bf2937ab1722
Taylor, P.
98af94dd-5107-4e6f-b95e-6ccbcec2f172

Krishnan, Mohanraj, Shelling, Andrew N., Wall, Clare R., Mitchell, Edwin A., Murphy, Rinki, McCowan, Lesley M.E. and Thompson, John M.D. , Children of SCOPE Study Group (2018) Gene-by-activity interactions on obesity traits of 6-year-old New Zealand European children: A children of SCOPE study. Pediatric Exercise Science, 30 (1), 71-82. (doi:10.1123/pes.2017-0077).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: The decline of physical activity in children is considered an important determinant to explain the rising rates of obesity. However, this risk may be augmented in children who are genetically susceptible to increased weight gain. We hypothesized that a sedentary lifestyle and moderate activity will interact with genetic loci, resulting in differential effects in relation to obesity risk. Methods: We recruited 643 European children born to participants in the New Zealand-based Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study. Seventy gene variants were evaluated by the Sequenom assay. Interaction analyses were performed between the genetic variants and the activity type derived from actigraphy, in relation to percentage body fat. Results: We found a statistically significant association between increased proportions of sedentary activitywith increased percentage body fat scores (P = .012). The OLFM4-9568856 (P = .01) and GNPDA2-rs10938397 (P = .044) gene variants showed genotype differences with proportions of sedentary activity. Similarly, the OLFM4-9568856 (P = .021), CLOCK-rs4864548 (P = .029), and LEPR-1045895 (P = .047) showed genotype differences with proportions of moderate activity. We found evidence for unadjusted gene-by-activity interactions of SPACA3/SPRASArs16967845, PFKP-rs6602024, and SH2B1-rs7498665 on percentage body fat scores. Conclusions: These findings indicate a differential effect of physical activity in relation to obesity risk, suggesting that children genetically predisposed to increased weight gain may benefit from higher levels of moderate activity.

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More information

Published date: 1 February 2018
Keywords: BMI z scores, Childhood obesity, Genetics, Moderate activity, Percentage body fat, Sedentary behavior

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420399
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420399
ISSN: 0899-8493
PURE UUID: 648a657a-0b1c-4673-9bd9-a9a1616a3dea
ORCID for K. M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 May 2018 16:31
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:35

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Contributors

Author: Mohanraj Krishnan
Author: Andrew N. Shelling
Author: Clare R. Wall
Author: Edwin A. Mitchell
Author: Rinki Murphy
Author: Lesley M.E. McCowan
Author: John M.D. Thompson
Author: W. Cutfield
Author: Y. Huang
Author: A. Stewart
Author: R. Taylor
Author: K. M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: L. Poston
Author: P. Taylor
Corporate Author: Children of SCOPE Study Group

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