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Candidate gender and media attention in the 2015 UK General Election

Candidate gender and media attention in the 2015 UK General Election
Candidate gender and media attention in the 2015 UK General Election
Some scholars have argued that lower levels of media attention given to female candidates, relative to male candidates, may contribute to the under-representation of women in politics. Yet, other research suggests female candidates may receive more coverage than male candidates. To advance our understanding of this issue, we introduce and analyse a novel dataset measuring the weekly quantity of newspaper coverage given to 72 different candidates across 34 of the most marginal constituencies in the 2015 UK General Election. The data span 31 local and 6 national newspapers. Statistical analyses and two pairs of quantitatively matched, qualitative comparisons suggest that female candidates received more newspaper coverage than male candidates, even after controlling for several alternative predictors of media attention including party, incumbency, and time until election. Our findings have important implications for debates about gender equality in British politics.
media, gender, british politics, elections, campaigning, quantitative analysis, mixed methods, matching methods
0031-2290
1-22
Murphy, Justin
cdf28232-2d67-4188-98cf-d81896682bf0
Rek, Beata
bb4abf65-e0c9-44c7-aa8e-a074022d29c6
Murphy, Justin
cdf28232-2d67-4188-98cf-d81896682bf0
Rek, Beata
bb4abf65-e0c9-44c7-aa8e-a074022d29c6

Murphy, Justin and Rek, Beata (2018) Candidate gender and media attention in the 2015 UK General Election. Parliamentary Affairs, 1-22. (doi:10.1093/pa/gsy019).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Some scholars have argued that lower levels of media attention given to female candidates, relative to male candidates, may contribute to the under-representation of women in politics. Yet, other research suggests female candidates may receive more coverage than male candidates. To advance our understanding of this issue, we introduce and analyse a novel dataset measuring the weekly quantity of newspaper coverage given to 72 different candidates across 34 of the most marginal constituencies in the 2015 UK General Election. The data span 31 local and 6 national newspapers. Statistical analyses and two pairs of quantitatively matched, qualitative comparisons suggest that female candidates received more newspaper coverage than male candidates, even after controlling for several alternative predictors of media attention including party, incumbency, and time until election. Our findings have important implications for debates about gender equality in British politics.

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Accepted/In Press date: 21 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 April 2018
Keywords: media, gender, british politics, elections, campaigning, quantitative analysis, mixed methods, matching methods

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420650
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420650
ISSN: 0031-2290
PURE UUID: 2f21db04-0ebb-4bd5-bcc0-d4f62f043c81

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Date deposited: 11 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 04:27

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Contributors

Author: Justin Murphy
Author: Beata Rek

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