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Prevention of viral induced asthma attacks using inhaled budesonide

Prevention of viral induced asthma attacks using inhaled budesonide
Prevention of viral induced asthma attacks using inhaled budesonide

Thirty two preschool children were entered into a double blind, placebo controlled study using intermittent budesonide to treat viral induced wheeze. Active treatment was either 800 μg twice a day via a spacer or 1600 μg twice a day via a spacer and facemask in those children too young to use a mouthpiece. Treatment was started at the onset of an upper respiratory tract infection and continued for seven days or until symptoms had resolved for 24 hours. Each child remained in the study until they had completed using one pair of budesonide and placebo inhalers in random order without the need for additional oral prednisolone. Twenty five children completed 28 treatment pairs. All 25 families were asked to express a preference after completing their first treatment pair: 12 preferred budesonide and six preferred placebo; seven had no preference. Symptom scores were compared in 17 treatment pairs that were completed without the need for oral prednisolone. Mean day and night time wheeze in the first week after infection were significantly lower in those receiving budesonide. Intermittent inhalation of budesonide can modify the severity of wheezing in preschool children developing asthma after viral respiratory infections but improvements were modest with the doses used in this study.

0003-9888
85-87
Connett, G.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Lenney, W.
6f3a5624-186a-4181-825e-41cc0adbc55f
Connett, G.
55d5676c-90d8-46bf-a508-62eded276516
Lenney, W.
6f3a5624-186a-4181-825e-41cc0adbc55f

Connett, G. and Lenney, W. (1993) Prevention of viral induced asthma attacks using inhaled budesonide. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 68 (1), 85-87. (doi:10.1136/adc.68.1.85).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Thirty two preschool children were entered into a double blind, placebo controlled study using intermittent budesonide to treat viral induced wheeze. Active treatment was either 800 μg twice a day via a spacer or 1600 μg twice a day via a spacer and facemask in those children too young to use a mouthpiece. Treatment was started at the onset of an upper respiratory tract infection and continued for seven days or until symptoms had resolved for 24 hours. Each child remained in the study until they had completed using one pair of budesonide and placebo inhalers in random order without the need for additional oral prednisolone. Twenty five children completed 28 treatment pairs. All 25 families were asked to express a preference after completing their first treatment pair: 12 preferred budesonide and six preferred placebo; seven had no preference. Symptom scores were compared in 17 treatment pairs that were completed without the need for oral prednisolone. Mean day and night time wheeze in the first week after infection were significantly lower in those receiving budesonide. Intermittent inhalation of budesonide can modify the severity of wheezing in preschool children developing asthma after viral respiratory infections but improvements were modest with the doses used in this study.

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Published date: 1993

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420673
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420673
ISSN: 0003-9888
PURE UUID: d0fe0674-d65b-4ff5-8bcc-e52555996a81
ORCID for G. Connett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1310-3239

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Date deposited: 11 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:22

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Contributors

Author: G. Connett ORCID iD
Author: W. Lenney

University divisions

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