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End of use textiles: gifting and giving in relation to societal and situational factors

End of use textiles: gifting and giving in relation to societal and situational factors
End of use textiles: gifting and giving in relation to societal and situational factors
The clothing and fashion industry is associated with the seeking of new trends to meet and influence consumer demands. In consequence, the rates at which clothing and other textiles are purchased are high, as are the associated rates at which end-of-use items arise. Ensuring that methods and systems are in place to permit and encourage items deemed to be end-of-use by one person to be utilised to their full potential by other(s) is clearly desirable. This study aimed to elucidate how societal and situational factors influence the purchasing of clothing and other textiles, how decisions are made regarding end-of-use of these items, and the routes and means by which end-of-use textiles are subsequently passed on or disposed of. A comparison was therefore made of the public in Southampton (UK; relatively high income and established waste management systems) and Dakar (Senegal; relatively low income and with largely informal waste management systems) in which societal and situational factors contrast. Comparison of these two case studies was thus expected to provide insight as to the influence(s) of society and situation upon the generation and fate of end-of-use textiles. Through a questionnaire survey, the study found that factors leading to purchasing, decisions regarding end-of-use of items and post-use destinations differed markedly between these two contrasting cities. However, reuse of end-of-use clothing and textiles was common in both cities, which is desirable in reference to the aims and principles of the waste hierarchy. High levels of reuse occur despite the common belief that more developed and established systems provide better opportunities for effective waste and resource management.
155-161
Diop, S.-A.
ad82928e-2e4f-4004-bfbb-0e609f8453e8
Shaw, Peter
935dfebf-9fb6-483c-86da-a21dba8c1989
Diop, S.-A.
ad82928e-2e4f-4004-bfbb-0e609f8453e8
Shaw, Peter
935dfebf-9fb6-483c-86da-a21dba8c1989

Diop, S.-A. and Shaw, Peter (2018) End of use textiles: gifting and giving in relation to societal and situational factors. Detritus, 1, 155-161. (doi:10.26403/detritus/2018.15).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The clothing and fashion industry is associated with the seeking of new trends to meet and influence consumer demands. In consequence, the rates at which clothing and other textiles are purchased are high, as are the associated rates at which end-of-use items arise. Ensuring that methods and systems are in place to permit and encourage items deemed to be end-of-use by one person to be utilised to their full potential by other(s) is clearly desirable. This study aimed to elucidate how societal and situational factors influence the purchasing of clothing and other textiles, how decisions are made regarding end-of-use of these items, and the routes and means by which end-of-use textiles are subsequently passed on or disposed of. A comparison was therefore made of the public in Southampton (UK; relatively high income and established waste management systems) and Dakar (Senegal; relatively low income and with largely informal waste management systems) in which societal and situational factors contrast. Comparison of these two case studies was thus expected to provide insight as to the influence(s) of society and situation upon the generation and fate of end-of-use textiles. Through a questionnaire survey, the study found that factors leading to purchasing, decisions regarding end-of-use of items and post-use destinations differed markedly between these two contrasting cities. However, reuse of end-of-use clothing and textiles was common in both cities, which is desirable in reference to the aims and principles of the waste hierarchy. High levels of reuse occur despite the common belief that more developed and established systems provide better opportunities for effective waste and resource management.

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Diop Shaw Detritus January 2018 (revised _clean) - Accepted Manuscript
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DETRITUS 01-2018_pages 155-161_Paper 0045 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 March 2018
Published date: 31 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420727
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420727
PURE UUID: 5da5e2d1-9755-4833-9e0e-accf42ddf243
ORCID for Peter Shaw: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0925-5010

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 02:38

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Contributors

Author: S.-A. Diop
Author: Peter Shaw ORCID iD

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