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Comparing the mental health of rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts in China

Comparing the mental health of rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts in China
Comparing the mental health of rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts in China

Background: In recent years, the issue of migrant children with peasant parents working in cities has attracted widespread attention in recent years because of the sheer number and the benefits bundled in China's household. The focus has gradually extended from early education opportunities to all aspects of physical and mental development, especially the social adaptation and mental health of migrant children. The negative impact of environment changes on migrant children' mental health is very worrying for parents and the society. Some studies have found that immigrant children's mental health is significantly lower than their peers, but there are also studies that hold the opposite view. Thus, the mental health status of migrant children is still a controversial issue, which may have a certain relationship with the potential differences in the specific problems of mental health, regions, comparison objects, and researchers. The objective of this protocol is to investigate whether mental health and subdimensions differ between rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts living in China and examine study characteristics that might result in differences among studies. 

Methods: We will search PubMed, Embase, OVID, ERIC, Web of Science, and Chinese databases including CNKI, Chongqing VIP, and Wan Fang data from start to April 2018. Cross-sectional studies with a comparison of migrant children and their counterparts will be included. The primary outcome will be the mean and standard deviation of mental health and its sub-dimensions. Standardized mean difference is used as the main effect value. Subgroup analyses will be carried out by the location of studies and school type of. Sensitivity analyses will be conducted to assess the robustness of the findings. Analyses will be performed with RevMan and Stata software. 

Results: This systematic review and meta-analysis will compare the mental health status of rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts living in China. Conclusion: The results of this systematic and meta-analysis will be helpful to get a more reliable understanding of the mental health of rural-to-urban migrant children and the reasons for the controversy on this issue.

China, mental health, meta-analysis, migrant children, systematic review
0025-7974
Zhang, Jun Hua
a4628c00-1e1c-4729-8d8a-e7619a2c1edf
Yan, Li Xia
1f570e1c-8911-4b29-8782-744b3260c620
Yuan, Yang
1ec86511-7bf5-4ca2-a61f-9daa99b6f8a9
Zhang, Jun Hua
a4628c00-1e1c-4729-8d8a-e7619a2c1edf
Yan, Li Xia
1f570e1c-8911-4b29-8782-744b3260c620
Yuan, Yang
1ec86511-7bf5-4ca2-a61f-9daa99b6f8a9

Zhang, Jun Hua, Yan, Li Xia and Yuan, Yang (2018) Comparing the mental health of rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts in China. Medicine (United States), 97 (17), [e0597]. (doi:10.1097/MD.0000000000010597).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: In recent years, the issue of migrant children with peasant parents working in cities has attracted widespread attention in recent years because of the sheer number and the benefits bundled in China's household. The focus has gradually extended from early education opportunities to all aspects of physical and mental development, especially the social adaptation and mental health of migrant children. The negative impact of environment changes on migrant children' mental health is very worrying for parents and the society. Some studies have found that immigrant children's mental health is significantly lower than their peers, but there are also studies that hold the opposite view. Thus, the mental health status of migrant children is still a controversial issue, which may have a certain relationship with the potential differences in the specific problems of mental health, regions, comparison objects, and researchers. The objective of this protocol is to investigate whether mental health and subdimensions differ between rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts living in China and examine study characteristics that might result in differences among studies. 

Methods: We will search PubMed, Embase, OVID, ERIC, Web of Science, and Chinese databases including CNKI, Chongqing VIP, and Wan Fang data from start to April 2018. Cross-sectional studies with a comparison of migrant children and their counterparts will be included. The primary outcome will be the mean and standard deviation of mental health and its sub-dimensions. Standardized mean difference is used as the main effect value. Subgroup analyses will be carried out by the location of studies and school type of. Sensitivity analyses will be conducted to assess the robustness of the findings. Analyses will be performed with RevMan and Stata software. 

Results: This systematic review and meta-analysis will compare the mental health status of rural-to-urban migrant children and their counterparts living in China. Conclusion: The results of this systematic and meta-analysis will be helpful to get a more reliable understanding of the mental health of rural-to-urban migrant children and the reasons for the controversy on this issue.

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Accepted/In Press date: 4 April 2018
Published date: April 2018
Keywords: China, mental health, meta-analysis, migrant children, systematic review

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420861
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420861
ISSN: 0025-7974
PURE UUID: 4bb20b6f-d5bf-4e4e-bdb6-984202c50e74

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 00:12

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Contributors

Author: Jun Hua Zhang
Author: Li Xia Yan
Author: Yang Yuan

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