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Potential of wireless power transfer for dynamic charging of electric vehicles

Potential of wireless power transfer for dynamic charging of electric vehicles
Potential of wireless power transfer for dynamic charging of electric vehicles
Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) offers a viable means of charging Electric Vehicles (EV)’s whilst in a dynamic state (DWPT), mitigating issues concerning vehicle range, the size of on-board energy storage and the network distribution of static based charging systems. Such Charge While Driving (CWD) technology has the capability to accelerate EV market penetration through increasing user convenience, reducing EV costs and increasing driving range indefinitely, dependent upon sufficient charging infrastructure. This paper reviews current traction battery technologies, conductive and inductive charging processes, influential parameters specific to the dynamic charging state as well as highlighting notable work undertaken within the field of WPT charging systems. DWPT system requirements, specific to the driver, vehicle and infrastructure interaction environment are summarised and international standards highlighted in order to acknowledge the work that must be done within this area. It is important to recognise that the gap is not currently technological; instead, it is an implementation issue. Without the necessary standardisation, system architectures cannot be developed and implemented without fear of interoperability issues between countries or indeed systems. For successful deployment, the technologies impact should be maximised with the minimum quantity of infrastructure and technology use, deployment scenarios and locations are discussed that have the potential to bring this to fruition.
1751-956X
3-12
Hutchinson, Luke
dacee184-d1d6-4cd3-a7bb-606ad1d6cc34
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Anvari, Bani
f94e2ccb-1d88-4980-8d29-f4281995d072
Naberezhnykh, Denis
4e30b390-8f0d-449e-a6ff-7c628e196052
Hutchinson, Luke
dacee184-d1d6-4cd3-a7bb-606ad1d6cc34
Waterson, Ben
60a59616-54f7-4c31-920d-975583953286
Anvari, Bani
f94e2ccb-1d88-4980-8d29-f4281995d072
Naberezhnykh, Denis
4e30b390-8f0d-449e-a6ff-7c628e196052

Hutchinson, Luke, Waterson, Ben, Anvari, Bani and Naberezhnykh, Denis (2019) Potential of wireless power transfer for dynamic charging of electric vehicles. IET Intelligent Transport Systems, 13 (1), 3-12. (doi:10.1049/iet-its.2018.5221).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) offers a viable means of charging Electric Vehicles (EV)’s whilst in a dynamic state (DWPT), mitigating issues concerning vehicle range, the size of on-board energy storage and the network distribution of static based charging systems. Such Charge While Driving (CWD) technology has the capability to accelerate EV market penetration through increasing user convenience, reducing EV costs and increasing driving range indefinitely, dependent upon sufficient charging infrastructure. This paper reviews current traction battery technologies, conductive and inductive charging processes, influential parameters specific to the dynamic charging state as well as highlighting notable work undertaken within the field of WPT charging systems. DWPT system requirements, specific to the driver, vehicle and infrastructure interaction environment are summarised and international standards highlighted in order to acknowledge the work that must be done within this area. It is important to recognise that the gap is not currently technological; instead, it is an implementation issue. Without the necessary standardisation, system architectures cannot be developed and implemented without fear of interoperability issues between countries or indeed systems. For successful deployment, the technologies impact should be maximised with the minimum quantity of infrastructure and technology use, deployment scenarios and locations are discussed that have the potential to bring this to fruition.

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Accepted/In Press date: 10 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 July 2018
Published date: 3 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420873
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420873
ISSN: 1751-956X
PURE UUID: ffc2e975-672a-4771-8c76-3937b6c79bdb
ORCID for Luke Hutchinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1667-482X
ORCID for Ben Waterson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9817-7119
ORCID for Bani Anvari: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7916-7636

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 17 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 05:07

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Contributors

Author: Luke Hutchinson ORCID iD
Author: Ben Waterson ORCID iD
Author: Bani Anvari ORCID iD
Author: Denis Naberezhnykh

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