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The politics of human rights

The politics of human rights
The politics of human rights
The phrase ‘the politics of human rights’ can refer, variously, to political debates about the foundation, grounding or project of human rights, the variable ranking, observation or implementation of human rights, the political uses of human rights by state and non-state actors in international and domestic politics, and no doubt others. In this chapter, I want to address this phrase in two of its senses by taking up two seemingly disparate dimensions of Brown’s work on human rights. First, the question of the grounding of human rights in the light of Brown’s recent work on human rights and human nature. Second, the international politics of, and prospects for, the project of human rights in respect of Brown’s reflection on post-Cold War changes to the distribution of global power. In this chapter I offer both an account of the relationship of these two foci and a critical examination of Brown’s arguments in the context of wider debates on human rights.
Palgrave Macmillan
Owen, David
9fc71bca-07d1-44af-9248-1b9545265a58
Albert, Mathias
Lang, Antony
Owen, David
9fc71bca-07d1-44af-9248-1b9545265a58
Albert, Mathias
Lang, Antony

Owen, David (2018) The politics of human rights. In, Albert, Mathias and Lang, Antony (eds.) The Politics of International Political Theory. Palgrave Macmillan. (In Press)

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The phrase ‘the politics of human rights’ can refer, variously, to political debates about the foundation, grounding or project of human rights, the variable ranking, observation or implementation of human rights, the political uses of human rights by state and non-state actors in international and domestic politics, and no doubt others. In this chapter, I want to address this phrase in two of its senses by taking up two seemingly disparate dimensions of Brown’s work on human rights. First, the question of the grounding of human rights in the light of Brown’s recent work on human rights and human nature. Second, the international politics of, and prospects for, the project of human rights in respect of Brown’s reflection on post-Cold War changes to the distribution of global power. In this chapter I offer both an account of the relationship of these two foci and a critical examination of Brown’s arguments in the context of wider debates on human rights.

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Accepted/In Press date: 14 May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420900
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420900
PURE UUID: 3d4ffc37-e1ba-4755-95ec-df72e597a183
ORCID for David Owen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8865-6332

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Date deposited: 18 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:45

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