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Mobile no more? The innovative use of administrative data linked to a census-based longitudinal study to investigate migration within Scotland

Mobile no more? The innovative use of administrative data linked to a census-based longitudinal study to investigate migration within Scotland
Mobile no more? The innovative use of administrative data linked to a census-based longitudinal study to investigate migration within Scotland
This paper builds upon existing scholarship on changing patterns and processes of internal migration, especially the surprising and potentially disconcerting recently documented trend towards falling internal migration intensities since the late 20th Century in many developed countries. The analysis utilises new research opportunities presented by the recent linking of administrative health data into the census-based Scottish Longitudinal Study (SLS). We find a modest recent decrease in aggregate rates of address changing within Scotland. This decline is partly driven by the population sub-groups that have been conventionally most mobile, especially over longer distances, becoming less migratory. This supports the notion of an evening out of some of the main socio-economic determinants of migration and validates calls for a greater emphasis on the drivers and consequences of population immobility within migration studies.
88
ESRC Centre for Population Change
Ernsten, Annemarie
13c8cae8-4714-4239-b0d4-f33ed7699b99
Feng, Zhixin
33c0073f-a67c-4d8a-9fea-5a502420e589
Everington, Dawn
44ee324a-1977-4e11-bdc1-edb653e908bf
Ernsten, Annemarie
13c8cae8-4714-4239-b0d4-f33ed7699b99
Feng, Zhixin
33c0073f-a67c-4d8a-9fea-5a502420e589
Everington, Dawn
44ee324a-1977-4e11-bdc1-edb653e908bf

Ernsten, Annemarie, Feng, Zhixin and Everington, Dawn (2018) Mobile no more? The innovative use of administrative data linked to a census-based longitudinal study to investigate migration within Scotland (Working Paper Series, 88) University of Southampton. ESRC Centre for Population Change

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

This paper builds upon existing scholarship on changing patterns and processes of internal migration, especially the surprising and potentially disconcerting recently documented trend towards falling internal migration intensities since the late 20th Century in many developed countries. The analysis utilises new research opportunities presented by the recent linking of administrative health data into the census-based Scottish Longitudinal Study (SLS). We find a modest recent decrease in aggregate rates of address changing within Scotland. This decline is partly driven by the population sub-groups that have been conventionally most mobile, especially over longer distances, becoming less migratory. This supports the notion of an evening out of some of the main socio-economic determinants of migration and validates calls for a greater emphasis on the drivers and consequences of population immobility within migration studies.

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Published date: 30 April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420907
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420907
PURE UUID: 84f246cf-649e-4912-ae27-907fc80f1559

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Date deposited: 18 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:29

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