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Osteosarcopenia: a review

Osteosarcopenia: a review
Osteosarcopenia: a review
Osteosarcopenia is a newly described syndrome that describes the co-existence of osteoporosis and sarcopenia, two chronic musculoskeletal conditions associated with ageing. Osteoporosis, a condition of low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone, and sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass, strength and function, often co-exist in a frail subset of the elderly population, leading to significantly worsened outcomes than seen in either condition alone. These include a greater risk of falls, fractures and institutionalization, and significant socioeconomic costs. With our ageing population, osteosarcopenia is a public health concern that will become increasingly relevant in the future. Its aetiology is multifactorial, with mechanical, biochemical, genetic and lifestyle factors all contributing to involution of the ‘bone–muscle unit’. Improved understanding of the interactions between muscle and bone could facilitate the development of new therapeutic agents which target muscle and bone as one. Together with existing pharmacological, nutritional and exercise-based therapies, this should enable a more holistic approach to osteosarcopenia in the future.
253-258
Paintin, James
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Cooper, Cyrus
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Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1
Paintin, James
0ab9aa92-2352-4daf-8c13-836d7533a40d
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Dennison, Elaine
ee647287-edb4-4392-8361-e59fd505b1d1

Paintin, James, Cooper, Cyrus and Dennison, Elaine (2018) Osteosarcopenia: a review. British Journal of Hospital Medicine, 79 (5), 253-258. (doi:10.12968/hmed.2018.79.5.253).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Osteosarcopenia is a newly described syndrome that describes the co-existence of osteoporosis and sarcopenia, two chronic musculoskeletal conditions associated with ageing. Osteoporosis, a condition of low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration of bone, and sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass, strength and function, often co-exist in a frail subset of the elderly population, leading to significantly worsened outcomes than seen in either condition alone. These include a greater risk of falls, fractures and institutionalization, and significant socioeconomic costs. With our ageing population, osteosarcopenia is a public health concern that will become increasingly relevant in the future. Its aetiology is multifactorial, with mechanical, biochemical, genetic and lifestyle factors all contributing to involution of the ‘bone–muscle unit’. Improved understanding of the interactions between muscle and bone could facilitate the development of new therapeutic agents which target muscle and bone as one. Together with existing pharmacological, nutritional and exercise-based therapies, this should enable a more holistic approach to osteosarcopenia in the future.

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Osteosarcopenia review - British Journal of Hospital Medicine - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 May 2018
Published date: May 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420930
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420930
PURE UUID: dac720e1-e577-423d-8591-86ffb06f334d
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Elaine Dennison: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3048-4961

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 05:24

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