The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Moult location and diet of auks in the North Sea, inferred from coupled light-based and isotope-based geolocation

Moult location and diet of auks in the North Sea, inferred from coupled light-based and isotope-based geolocation
Moult location and diet of auks in the North Sea, inferred from coupled light-based and isotope-based geolocation
Many pelagic seabirds moult their feathers while at sea, which is an energetically costly behaviour. Mortality rates during moult can be high, so spatial and trophic ecology during this critical period is important for understanding demographic patterns. Unfortunately, individual foraging behaviours specifically linked to at-sea moult are commonly unclear. This paper combines two different approaches to geolocation: data from bird-borne geolocation loggers and stable-isotope assignment using carbon and nitrogen isotope maps (isoscapes). Coupling two geolocation processes allows some uncertainties associated with isotope-based assignment to be constrained. We applied this approach to quantify species-specific foraging locations and individual trophic variability during feather regrowth in three sympatric auk populations breeding on the Isle of May, Scotland (common guillemot (Uria aalge), razorbill (Alca torda) and Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica)). Inferred foraging areas during moult differed between species and feather types. Guillemots likely underwent moult within the southern North Sea, razorbills along the east coast of England and into the southern North Sea and puffins off the east coast of Scotland. Estimates of individual trophic position varied considerably within feather types (up to 1 trophic level difference between individuals), among feather types grown during different time periods, and across the three species, with guillemots consistently foraging at higher trophic positions than razorbills and puffins. Used in combination, these methods better constrain foraging areas during moult, as well as providing a technique to explore individual differences and flexibility in foraging strategy, which is valuable information for both seabird conservation and marine spatial planning.
0171-8630
239-251
St. John Glew, Katie
e37c7b2d-6aa0-4bef-97da-8c9630f2705e
Wanless, Sarah
1e8809ce-cf07-4223-a458-b332949354bd
Harris, Michael
f06407cc-5de6-4576-959b-63403d852d53
Daunt, Francis
19317908-e818-44bd-82c8-91eb329c2df8
Erikstad, Kjell Einar
365183e9-9be9-47cb-9304-733c1640baaa
Strom, Hallvard
6db88ee1-c1e2-4c70-afa6-2453341fca56
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205
St. John Glew, Katie
e37c7b2d-6aa0-4bef-97da-8c9630f2705e
Wanless, Sarah
1e8809ce-cf07-4223-a458-b332949354bd
Harris, Michael
f06407cc-5de6-4576-959b-63403d852d53
Daunt, Francis
19317908-e818-44bd-82c8-91eb329c2df8
Erikstad, Kjell Einar
365183e9-9be9-47cb-9304-733c1640baaa
Strom, Hallvard
6db88ee1-c1e2-4c70-afa6-2453341fca56
Trueman, Clive N.
d00d3bd6-a47b-4d47-89ae-841c3d506205

St. John Glew, Katie, Wanless, Sarah, Harris, Michael, Daunt, Francis, Erikstad, Kjell Einar, Strom, Hallvard and Trueman, Clive N. (2018) Moult location and diet of auks in the North Sea, inferred from coupled light-based and isotope-based geolocation. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 599, 239-251. (doi:10.3354/meps12624.).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Many pelagic seabirds moult their feathers while at sea, which is an energetically costly behaviour. Mortality rates during moult can be high, so spatial and trophic ecology during this critical period is important for understanding demographic patterns. Unfortunately, individual foraging behaviours specifically linked to at-sea moult are commonly unclear. This paper combines two different approaches to geolocation: data from bird-borne geolocation loggers and stable-isotope assignment using carbon and nitrogen isotope maps (isoscapes). Coupling two geolocation processes allows some uncertainties associated with isotope-based assignment to be constrained. We applied this approach to quantify species-specific foraging locations and individual trophic variability during feather regrowth in three sympatric auk populations breeding on the Isle of May, Scotland (common guillemot (Uria aalge), razorbill (Alca torda) and Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica)). Inferred foraging areas during moult differed between species and feather types. Guillemots likely underwent moult within the southern North Sea, razorbills along the east coast of England and into the southern North Sea and puffins off the east coast of Scotland. Estimates of individual trophic position varied considerably within feather types (up to 1 trophic level difference between individuals), among feather types grown during different time periods, and across the three species, with guillemots consistently foraging at higher trophic positions than razorbills and puffins. Used in combination, these methods better constrain foraging areas during moult, as well as providing a technique to explore individual differences and flexibility in foraging strategy, which is valuable information for both seabird conservation and marine spatial planning.

Text
Manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
Download (1MB)
Text
m599p239 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (750kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 4 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420938
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420938
ISSN: 0171-8630
PURE UUID: 298ba3e4-2de4-4724-b923-8e5e4201316c

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 05:26

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Katie St. John Glew
Author: Sarah Wanless
Author: Michael Harris
Author: Francis Daunt
Author: Kjell Einar Erikstad
Author: Hallvard Strom

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×