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Hybrid bodies rethinking heart transplantation: A project across art,social science, medecine, philosophy, sociology

Hybrid bodies rethinking heart transplantation: A project across art,social science, medecine, philosophy, sociology
Hybrid bodies rethinking heart transplantation: A project across art,social science, medecine, philosophy, sociology
The Hybrid Bodies book features essays and artworks from prominent
artists, theorists and art historians, who address the Process of
Incorporating a Transplanted Heart (PITH) research team’s efforts within the multifaceted world of transplant medicine. Few organs are as charged as the human heart. Beyond its anatomical function, it represents immense personal significance and speaks to the age-old question at the core of human selfhood… “Who am I?” Advances in medical transplantation technologies raise urgent questions about bodily integrity, personal identity, and the relationship between recipients and their donors.
Heart, transplant
Concordia University
Carnie, Andrew
8b71b0b4-5dc7-4ce9-8914-332402077859
Shildrick, Margrit
c6d33367-2660-4e33-bfee-52cc4405839e
El-Sheikh, Tammer
086fd64e-f5f4-49de-8047-13bf2b2f21a0
Carnie, Andrew
8b71b0b4-5dc7-4ce9-8914-332402077859
Shildrick, Margrit
c6d33367-2660-4e33-bfee-52cc4405839e
El-Sheikh, Tammer
086fd64e-f5f4-49de-8047-13bf2b2f21a0

Carnie, Andrew, Shildrick, Margrit and El-Sheikh, Tammer (2016) Hybrid bodies rethinking heart transplantation: A project across art,social science, medecine, philosophy, sociology , Montreal. Concordia University, 36pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

The Hybrid Bodies book features essays and artworks from prominent
artists, theorists and art historians, who address the Process of
Incorporating a Transplanted Heart (PITH) research team’s efforts within the multifaceted world of transplant medicine. Few organs are as charged as the human heart. Beyond its anatomical function, it represents immense personal significance and speaks to the age-old question at the core of human selfhood… “Who am I?” Advances in medical transplantation technologies raise urgent questions about bodily integrity, personal identity, and the relationship between recipients and their donors.

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More information

Published date: 19 October 2016
Keywords: Heart, transplant

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420963
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420963
PURE UUID: 6bd91a89-007a-418b-a533-a20e5dfa0878

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 May 2018 16:31
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:35

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