The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Brexit, the tides and Canute: The fracturing politics of the British State

Brexit, the tides and Canute: The fracturing politics of the British State
Brexit, the tides and Canute: The fracturing politics of the British State
The result and aftermath of the referendum on the UK’s membership of the European Union has generated considerable attention, not just among observers of British politics. Even if some of wider context that shaped the referendum is far from unique to the UK, the road to Brexit is a product of distinct pathologies of the British state and politics that will introduce its own distinctive ways of doing policy and politics: With a state already under strain, a politics that is increasingly divided, and its people(s) discontented, the challenges confronting Britain’s ways of governing are substantial. This essay considers three analytical lenses, or ‘mega-trends’, through which to view the decision of the Cameron government to call the referendum: (1) the electoral politics perspective that focuses on the populist-nationalist turn and fragmentation of the British party system, (2) the dominant policy paradigm perspective that points to a silent crisis of the neoliberal policy consensus that had governed Britain since the 1970s, and (3) the referendum as a side-effect of both depoliticisation and the politics of the regulatory state. Based on these perspectives, we reflect on the potential implications of Brexit for the future of the British state and liberal democracy.
1350-1763
772-789
Jennings, William
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Lodge, Martin
ccca8f20-f037-4302-aa5e-4e9b1e8f4018
Jennings, William
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Lodge, Martin
ccca8f20-f037-4302-aa5e-4e9b1e8f4018

Jennings, William and Lodge, Martin (2019) Brexit, the tides and Canute: The fracturing politics of the British State. Journal of European Public Policy, 26 (5), 772-789. (doi:10.1080/13501763.2018.1478876).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The result and aftermath of the referendum on the UK’s membership of the European Union has generated considerable attention, not just among observers of British politics. Even if some of wider context that shaped the referendum is far from unique to the UK, the road to Brexit is a product of distinct pathologies of the British state and politics that will introduce its own distinctive ways of doing policy and politics: With a state already under strain, a politics that is increasingly divided, and its people(s) discontented, the challenges confronting Britain’s ways of governing are substantial. This essay considers three analytical lenses, or ‘mega-trends’, through which to view the decision of the Cameron government to call the referendum: (1) the electoral politics perspective that focuses on the populist-nationalist turn and fragmentation of the British party system, (2) the dominant policy paradigm perspective that points to a silent crisis of the neoliberal policy consensus that had governed Britain since the 1970s, and (3) the referendum as a side-effect of both depoliticisation and the politics of the regulatory state. Based on these perspectives, we reflect on the potential implications of Brexit for the future of the British state and liberal democracy.

Text
Brexit - JEPP - FINAL - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 30 November 2019.
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 May 2018
Published date: 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421011
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421011
ISSN: 1350-1763
PURE UUID: e0e9ef62-153b-43d0-8450-5b774be3d0ac
ORCID for William Jennings: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9007-8896

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×