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Correlative visualization of root mucilage degradation using X-ray CT and NMRI

Correlative visualization of root mucilage degradation using X-ray CT and NMRI
Correlative visualization of root mucilage degradation using X-ray CT and NMRI
Root exudates are a crucial component of the rhizosphere. Often, they take a form of a gel exuded by the plant roots and are thought to influence the soil aggregation, root penetration into soil, soil nutrient availability, immobilization of toxic cations, and microbial activity amongst other things. In addition, the capacity of exudates to store water makes the plants potentially less susceptive to drought. Major components of root exudates are high molecular weight organic compounds consisting of predominantly polysaccharides and proteins, which makes it challenging to visualize using current rhizosphere visualization techniques, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). In this contribution, we use correlative X-ray CT (resolution ~20 μm) in combination with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, resolution ~120 μm) to set up groundwork to enable in situ visualization of mucilage in soil. This multimodal approach is necessary because mucilage density closely matches that of water. We use chia seeds as mucilage analog, because it has been found to have a similar consistency to root mucilage. Moreover, to understand mucilage development in time, a series of samples made by chia seeds placed in different porous media were prepared. Structurally and chemically, mucilage breaks down toward a water-like substance over a course of 2 weeks. Depending on its relative concentration, these changes were found to be less dominant when seeds were mixed in porous media. Having set up the groundwork for correlative imaging of chia seeds in water and an artificial soil (Nafion and sand/beads) this enables us to expand this imaging to deal with plant root exudates under natural conditions.
chia, mucilage, 1H-NMRI, X-ray CT, root-exudate, polysaccharides, rhizosphere
2296-665X
Van Veelen, Arjen
cb6f2c8b-4671-4836-88a0-3987fd2f2d67
Tourell, Monique C
cede77f9-f053-4db0-84d0-854bdf7c2aa4
Koebernick, Nicolai
118c4e45-02d8-42da-84c8-8ee4fac140ad
Pileio, Giuseppe
13f78e66-0707-4438-b9c9-6dbd3eb7d4e8
Roose, Tiina
3581ab5b-71e1-4897-8d88-59f13f3bccfe
Van Veelen, Arjen
cb6f2c8b-4671-4836-88a0-3987fd2f2d67
Tourell, Monique C
cede77f9-f053-4db0-84d0-854bdf7c2aa4
Koebernick, Nicolai
118c4e45-02d8-42da-84c8-8ee4fac140ad
Pileio, Giuseppe
13f78e66-0707-4438-b9c9-6dbd3eb7d4e8
Roose, Tiina
3581ab5b-71e1-4897-8d88-59f13f3bccfe

Van Veelen, Arjen, Tourell, Monique C, Koebernick, Nicolai, Pileio, Giuseppe and Roose, Tiina (2018) Correlative visualization of root mucilage degradation using X-ray CT and NMRI. Frontiers in Environmental Science. (doi:10.3389/fenvs.2018.00032).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Root exudates are a crucial component of the rhizosphere. Often, they take a form of a gel exuded by the plant roots and are thought to influence the soil aggregation, root penetration into soil, soil nutrient availability, immobilization of toxic cations, and microbial activity amongst other things. In addition, the capacity of exudates to store water makes the plants potentially less susceptive to drought. Major components of root exudates are high molecular weight organic compounds consisting of predominantly polysaccharides and proteins, which makes it challenging to visualize using current rhizosphere visualization techniques, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). In this contribution, we use correlative X-ray CT (resolution ~20 μm) in combination with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, resolution ~120 μm) to set up groundwork to enable in situ visualization of mucilage in soil. This multimodal approach is necessary because mucilage density closely matches that of water. We use chia seeds as mucilage analog, because it has been found to have a similar consistency to root mucilage. Moreover, to understand mucilage development in time, a series of samples made by chia seeds placed in different porous media were prepared. Structurally and chemically, mucilage breaks down toward a water-like substance over a course of 2 weeks. Depending on its relative concentration, these changes were found to be less dominant when seeds were mixed in porous media. Having set up the groundwork for correlative imaging of chia seeds in water and an artificial soil (Nafion and sand/beads) this enables us to expand this imaging to deal with plant root exudates under natural conditions.

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NMRI_imaging_chia_review_final_2-TR-01-05-2018 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 May 2018
Keywords: chia, mucilage, 1H-NMRI, X-ray CT, root-exudate, polysaccharides, rhizosphere

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421014
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421014
ISSN: 2296-665X
PURE UUID: d64c1fb9-b14c-4ead-a395-3999ff0f5070
ORCID for Giuseppe Pileio: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9223-3896
ORCID for Tiina Roose: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8710-1063

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:43

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Contributors

Author: Arjen Van Veelen
Author: Monique C Tourell
Author: Nicolai Koebernick
Author: Giuseppe Pileio ORCID iD
Author: Tiina Roose ORCID iD

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