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Altered perception-action binding modulates inhibitory control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

Altered perception-action binding modulates inhibitory control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome
Altered perception-action binding modulates inhibitory control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome
Background

Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) is a multifaceted neuropsychiatric developmental disorder with onset in childhood or adolescence and frequent remissions in early adulthood. A rather new emerging concept of this syndrome suggests that it is a disorder of purposeful actions, in which sensory processes and their relation to motor responses (actions) play a particularly important role. Thus, this syndrome might be conceived as a condition of altered ‘perception‐action binding’. In the current study, we test this novel concept in the context of inhibitory control.

Methods

We examined N = 35 adolescent GTS patients and N = 39 healthy controls in a Go/Nogo‐task manipulating the complexity of sensory information triggering identical actions; i.e. to inhibit a motor response. This was combined with event‐related potential recordings, EEG data decomposition and source localization.

Results

GTS patients showed worse performance compared to controls and larger performance differences when inhibitory control had to be exerted using unimodal visual compared to bimodal auditory‐visual stimuli. This suggests increased binding between bimodal stimuli and responses leading to increased costs of switching between responses instructed by bimodal and those instructed by unimodal stimuli. The neurophysiological data showed that this was related to mechanisms mediating between stimulus evaluation and response selection; i.e. perception‐action binding processes in the right inferior parietal cortex (BA40).

Conclusions

Stimulus‐action inhibition binding is stronger in GTS patients than healthy controls and affects inhibitory control corroborating the concept suggesting that GTS might be a condition of altered perception‐action integration (binding); i.e. a disorder of purposeful actions.
0021-9630
953-962
Petruo, Vanessa
ac5b04a8-096a-49de-8154-a3189310bc17
Bodmer, Benjamin
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Brandt, Valerie
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Baumung, Leoni
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Roessner, Veit
4cb7d40b-0022-4785-abb6-2c05f346380d
Münchau, Alexander
98763092-3eeb-4327-9db7-c41dbf34d393
Beste, Christian
35cb3e43-9f72-4472-b9cc-c2512a2fdf68
Petruo, Vanessa
ac5b04a8-096a-49de-8154-a3189310bc17
Bodmer, Benjamin
65b3dfff-4854-477b-a57e-6d343967d7e4
Brandt, Valerie
e41f5832-70e4-407d-8a15-85b861761656
Baumung, Leoni
d21b23be-e15b-4f52-8456-9ffd617412b6
Roessner, Veit
4cb7d40b-0022-4785-abb6-2c05f346380d
Münchau, Alexander
98763092-3eeb-4327-9db7-c41dbf34d393
Beste, Christian
35cb3e43-9f72-4472-b9cc-c2512a2fdf68

Petruo, Vanessa, Bodmer, Benjamin, Brandt, Valerie, Baumung, Leoni, Roessner, Veit, Münchau, Alexander and Beste, Christian (2019) Altered perception-action binding modulates inhibitory control in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 60 (9), 953-962. (doi:10.1111/jcpp.12938).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) is a multifaceted neuropsychiatric developmental disorder with onset in childhood or adolescence and frequent remissions in early adulthood. A rather new emerging concept of this syndrome suggests that it is a disorder of purposeful actions, in which sensory processes and their relation to motor responses (actions) play a particularly important role. Thus, this syndrome might be conceived as a condition of altered ‘perception‐action binding’. In the current study, we test this novel concept in the context of inhibitory control.

Methods

We examined N = 35 adolescent GTS patients and N = 39 healthy controls in a Go/Nogo‐task manipulating the complexity of sensory information triggering identical actions; i.e. to inhibit a motor response. This was combined with event‐related potential recordings, EEG data decomposition and source localization.

Results

GTS patients showed worse performance compared to controls and larger performance differences when inhibitory control had to be exerted using unimodal visual compared to bimodal auditory‐visual stimuli. This suggests increased binding between bimodal stimuli and responses leading to increased costs of switching between responses instructed by bimodal and those instructed by unimodal stimuli. The neurophysiological data showed that this was related to mechanisms mediating between stimulus evaluation and response selection; i.e. perception‐action binding processes in the right inferior parietal cortex (BA40).

Conclusions

Stimulus‐action inhibition binding is stronger in GTS patients than healthy controls and affects inhibitory control corroborating the concept suggesting that GTS might be a condition of altered perception‐action integration (binding); i.e. a disorder of purposeful actions.

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MS_GTS_conflict Nogo_REVISION_FINAL - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 June 2018
Published date: September 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421179
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421179
ISSN: 0021-9630
PURE UUID: ac7779e1-0d96-41a3-9c8c-a03a05b8fa2b

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:10

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Contributors

Author: Vanessa Petruo
Author: Benjamin Bodmer
Author: Valerie Brandt
Author: Leoni Baumung
Author: Veit Roessner
Author: Alexander Münchau
Author: Christian Beste

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