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Factors predicting a good symptomatic outcome after Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE)

Factors predicting a good symptomatic outcome after Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE)
Factors predicting a good symptomatic outcome after Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE)

INTRODUCTION: As prostate artery embolisation (PAE) becomes an established treatment for benign prostatic obstruction, factors predicting good symptomatic outcome remain unclear. Pre-embolisation prostate size as a predictor is controversial with a handful of papers coming to conflicting conclusions. We aimed to investigate if an association existed in our patient cohort between prostate size and clinical benefit, in addition to evaluating percentage volume reduction as a predictor of symptomatic outcome following PAE.

MATERIALS OR METHODS: Prospective follow-up of 86 PAE patients at a single institution between June 2012 and January 2016 was conducted (mean age 64.9 years, range 54-80 years). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess strength of association between clinical improvement (change in IPSS) and other variables, of any statistical correlation, through Pearson's bivariate analysis.

RESULTS: No major procedural complications were identified and clinical success was achieved in 72.1% (n = 62) at 12 months. Initial prostate size and percentage reduction were found to have a significant association with clinical improvement. Multiple linear regression analysis (r2 = 0.48) demonstrated that percentage volume reduction at 3 months (r = 0.68, p < 0.001) had the strongest correlation with good symptomatic improvement at 12 months after adjusting for confounding factors.

CONCLUSION: Both the initial prostate size and percentage volume reduction at 3 months predict good symptomatic outcome at 12 months. These findings therefore aid patient selection and counselling to achieve optimal outcomes for men undergoing prostate artery embolisation.

Journal Article
0174-1551
1152-1159
Maclean, D.
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Harris, M.
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Drake, T.
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Maher, B.
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Modi, S.
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Dyer, J.
67e4120e-4ed4-44d0-a72a-93ae3e265fcb
Somani, B.
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Hacking, N.
b6287f0b-1b80-49a6-a01a-f52f9da671c8
Bryant, T.
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Maclean, D.
3f429b47-ac02-4568-af31-6b9d5927371a
Harris, M.
b0e2d8cb-44f8-47a5-8e1b-6ca9c04fe776
Drake, T.
18c31aab-1752-4af4-951b-e1a24ce82ccf
Maher, B.
3efad982-215d-489a-9a4b-5832a0d23b84
Modi, S.
3de96fdf-e375-47e8-9495-18b9a281555c
Dyer, J.
67e4120e-4ed4-44d0-a72a-93ae3e265fcb
Somani, B.
ab5fd1ce-02df-4b88-b25e-8ece396335d9
Hacking, N.
b6287f0b-1b80-49a6-a01a-f52f9da671c8
Bryant, T.
0b33acf2-e052-4d9f-9d44-7f1d8a656374

Maclean, D., Harris, M., Drake, T., Maher, B., Modi, S., Dyer, J., Somani, B., Hacking, N. and Bryant, T. (2018) Factors predicting a good symptomatic outcome after Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE). Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, 41 (8), 1152-1159. (doi:10.1007/s00270-018-1912-5).

Record type: Article

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: As prostate artery embolisation (PAE) becomes an established treatment for benign prostatic obstruction, factors predicting good symptomatic outcome remain unclear. Pre-embolisation prostate size as a predictor is controversial with a handful of papers coming to conflicting conclusions. We aimed to investigate if an association existed in our patient cohort between prostate size and clinical benefit, in addition to evaluating percentage volume reduction as a predictor of symptomatic outcome following PAE.

MATERIALS OR METHODS: Prospective follow-up of 86 PAE patients at a single institution between June 2012 and January 2016 was conducted (mean age 64.9 years, range 54-80 years). Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to assess strength of association between clinical improvement (change in IPSS) and other variables, of any statistical correlation, through Pearson's bivariate analysis.

RESULTS: No major procedural complications were identified and clinical success was achieved in 72.1% (n = 62) at 12 months. Initial prostate size and percentage reduction were found to have a significant association with clinical improvement. Multiple linear regression analysis (r2 = 0.48) demonstrated that percentage volume reduction at 3 months (r = 0.68, p < 0.001) had the strongest correlation with good symptomatic improvement at 12 months after adjusting for confounding factors.

CONCLUSION: Both the initial prostate size and percentage volume reduction at 3 months predict good symptomatic outcome at 12 months. These findings therefore aid patient selection and counselling to achieve optimal outcomes for men undergoing prostate artery embolisation.

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PAE - factors predicting it - Cardiovasc 2018 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 February 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 February 2018
Published date: August 2018
Keywords: Journal Article

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Local EPrints ID: 421209
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421209
ISSN: 0174-1551
PURE UUID: b4d808b9-f23a-47f1-bec2-b60b35890f5e

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Date deposited: 24 May 2018 16:31
Last modified: 20 Mar 2020 17:31

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Contributors

Author: D. Maclean
Author: M. Harris
Author: T. Drake
Author: B. Maher
Author: S. Modi
Author: J. Dyer
Author: B. Somani
Author: N. Hacking
Author: T. Bryant

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